Live Networks

Telepresence
Real-time network
Telematic
Telematic performance
Coactive
Virtual
Telecollaboration
Telexistence
Computer supported collaborative work
DH: Possibilities and Challenges of telepresence/live interaction over networks


Telepresence

"Telepresence" updated: monday june 16 2014
To Annotate:
Braasch, J. (2009). The Telematic Music System: Affordances for a New Instrument to Shape the Music of Tomorrow. Contemporary Music Review, 28(4-5), 421–432. doi:10.1080/07494460903422404
Buss, M., Peer, A., Schauss, T., Stefanov, N., Unterhinninghofen, U., Behrendt, S., … Sarkis, M. (2010). Development of a Multi-modal Multi-user Telepresence and Teleaction System. The International Journal of Robotics Research, 29(10), 1298–1316. doi:10.1177/0278364909351756
Chong, N. S., & Sakauchi, M. (2002). Discussing Web Pages with Chat-Pointers in E-coBrowse. Multimedia Tools and Applications, 17(1), 77–95.
Demeyer, S. (2001). Extensibility via a meta-level architecture. Journal of Network and Computer Applications, 24(1), 63–74. doi:10.1006/jnca.2000.0123
Dessen, M. (2010). New Polyphonies: Score Streams, Improvisation and Telepresence. Leonardo Music Journal, 20, 21–23.
Donati, L. P., & Prado, G. (2001). Artistic Environments of Telepresence on the World Wide Web.
Haans, A., & IJsselsteijn, W. A. (2012). Embodiment and telepresence: Toward a comprehensive theoretical framework. Interacting with Computers, 24(4), 211–218. doi:10.1016/j.intcom.2012.04.010
Hewitt, S., & Tremblay, P. A. (2008). Sound Communication: A Standard Syntax for Inter-Application, Inter-Device And Inter-Player Communication Over OSC. Retrieved from http://classes.berklee.edu/mbierylo/ICMC08/defevent/papers/cr1623.pdf
Iba, S. (2005). Interactive Multimodal Robot Programming. The International Journal of Robotics Research, 24(1), 83–104. doi:10.1177/0278364904049250
Joy, J., & Sinclair, P. (2009). Networked Music & Soundart Timeline (NMSAT): A Panoramic View of Practices and Techniques Related to Sound Transmission and Distance Listening. Contemporary Music Review, 28(4-5), 351–361. doi:10.1080/07494460903422172
Kirsh, D. (2013). Embodied cognition and the magical future of interaction design. ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, 20(1), 1–30. doi:10.1145/2442106.2442109
Kobayashi, H., Ueoka, R., & Hirose, M. (2009). Wearable forest clothing system: beyond human-computer interaction. Leonardo, 42(4), 300–306.
Naef, M., Staadt, O., & Gross, M. (2005). Multimedia integration into the blue-c API. Computers & Graphics, 29(1), 3–15. doi:10.1016/j.cag.2004.11.003
O’hara, K., Kjeldskov, J., & Paay, J. (2011). Blended interaction spaces for distributed team collaboration. ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, 18(1), 1–28. doi:10.1145/1959022.1959025
Puckette, M. (2009). Not Being There. Contemporary Music Review, 28(4-5), 409–412. doi:10.1080/07494460903422354
Rails on Maui. (n.d.). Retrieved June 6, 2014, from http://www.railsonmaui.com/
Schleyer, T. K. L. (2001). Collaboratories: leveraging information technology for cooperative research. Journal of Dental Research, 80(6).
Singh, V. K., Pirsiavash, H., Rishabh, I., & Jain, R. (2009). Towards Environment-to-Environment (E2E) multimedia communication systems. Multimedia Tools and Applications, 44(3), 361–388. doi:10.1007/s11042-009-0281-0
Sobell, N., & Hartzell, E. (2001). Sculpting in Time and Space: Interactive Work. Leonardo, 34(2), 101–107.
Surges, G., & Burns, C. (2008). Networking infrastructure for collaborative laptop improvisation. Spark Festival Proceedings. Retrieved from http://sfsound.org/~cburns/writings/surges-burns-spark2008.pdf
Traub, P. (2005). Sounding the net: Recent sonic works for the internet and computer networks. Contemporary Music Review, 24(6), 459–481. doi:10.1080/07494460500296136
Vanhoutte, K., & Wynants, N. (2011). Performing Phenomenology: Negotiating Presence in Intermedial Theatre. Foundations of Science, 16(2-3), 275–284. doi:10.1007/s10699-010-9193-8
Wang, X., Love, P. E. D., Kim, M. J., & Wang, W. (2014). Mutual awareness in collaborative design: An Augmented Reality integrated telepresence system. Computers in Industry, 65(2), 314–324. doi:10.1016/j.compind.2013.11.012
Zimmermann, R., Chew, E., Ay, S. A., & Pawar, M. (2008). Distributed musical performances: Architecture and stream management. ACM Transactions on Multimedia Computing, Communications, and Applications, 4(2), 1–23. doi:10.1145/1352012.1352018

Further Resources:
Alpiste Penalba, F., Rojas-Rajs, T., Lorente, P., Iglesias, F., Fernández, J., & Monguet, J. (2013). A telepresence learning environment for opera singing: distance lessons implementations over Internet2. Interactive Learning Environments, 21(5), 438–455. doi:10.1080/10494820.2011.584322
Barbatsis, G. S. (1999). Hypermediated telepresence: Sensemaking aesthetics of the newest communication art. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, 43(2), 280–298.
Birringer, J. H. (1999). Contemporary Performance/Technology. Theatre Journal, 51(4), 361–381.
Buss, M., Peer, A., Schauss, T., Stefanov, N., Unterhinninghofen, U., Behrendt, S., … Sarkis, M. (2010). Development of a Multi-modal Multi-user Telepresence and Teleaction System. The International Journal of Robotics Research, 29(10), 1298–1316. doi:10.1177/0278364909351756
Chong, N. S., & Sakauchi, M. (2002). Discussing Web Pages with Chat-Pointers in E-coBrowse. Multimedia Tools and Applications, 17(1), 77–95.
Chua, E. J. (2006). Laurie Anderson’s Telepresence. Postmodern Culture, 16(2). doi:10.1353/pmc.2006.0016
Demeyer, S. (2001). Extensibility via a meta-level architecture. Journal of Network and Computer Applications, 24(1), 63–74. doi:10.1006/jnca.2000.0123
Der Derian, J. (1998). Virtually Wagging the Dog. Theory & Event, 2(1). Retrieved from http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/theory_and_event/v002/2.1r_derderian.html
Donati, L. P., & Prado, G. (2001). Artistic Environments of Telepresence on the World Wide Web.
Faiola, A., Newlon, C., Pfaff, M., & Smyslova, O. (2013). Correlating the effects of flow and telepresence in virtual worlds: Enhancing our understanding of user behavior in game-based learning. Computers in Human Behavior, 29(3), 1113–1121. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2012.10.003
Haans, A., & IJsselsteijn, W. A. (2012). Embodiment and telepresence: Toward a comprehensive theoretical framework. Interacting with Computers, 24(4), 211–218. doi:10.1016/j.intcom.2012.04.010
Hayles, N. K. (1997). Situating Narrative in an Ecology of New Media. MFS Modern Fiction Studies, 43(3), 573–576. doi:10.1353/mfs.1997.0059
Herst, B. (2006). The Disembodied Eye. Retrieved from http://www.mitpressjournals.org/doi/pdf/10.1162/152028101753401857
Hewitt, S., & Tremblay, P. A. (2008). Sound Communication: A Standard Syntax for Inter-Application, Inter-Device And Inter-Player Communication Over OSC. Retrieved from http://classes.berklee.edu/mbierylo/ICMC08/defevent/papers/cr1623.pdf
Iba, S. (2005). Interactive Multimodal Robot Programming. The International Journal of Robotics Research, 24(1), 83–104. doi:10.1177/0278364904049250
Improving Remote Collaboration with Video Conferencing and Video Portals - Human–Computer Interaction -. (n.d.). Retrieved June 8, 2014, from http://www.tandfonline.com.libaccess.lib.mcmaster.ca/doi/full/10.1080/07370024.2014.921506
Kalaga, W. (2003). The Trouble with the Virtual. Symploke, 11(1), 96–103. doi:10.1353/sym.2003.0013
Kehrwald, B. (2010). Being online: social presence as subjectivity in online learning. London Review of Education, 8(1), 39–50. doi:10.1080/14748460903557688
Kirsh, D. (2013). Embodied cognition and the magical future of interaction design. ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, 20(1), 1–30. doi:10.1145/2442106.2442109
Kobayashi, H., Ueoka, R., & Hirose, M. (2009). Wearable forest clothing system: beyond human-computer interaction. Leonardo, 42(4), 300–306.
Lee, K. M. (2004). Presence, Explicated. Communication Theory, 14(1), 27–50.
Lipartito, K. (2003). Picturephone and the Information Age: The Social Meaning of Failure. Technology and Culture, 44(1), 50–81. doi:10.1353/tech.2003.0033
Mann, S. (2003). Existential Technology: Wearable Computing Is Not the Real Issue! Leonardo, 36(1), 19–25.
Markley, R. (1994). Shreds and Patches: The Morphogenesis of Cyberspace. Configurations, 2(3), 433–439. doi:10.1353/con.1994.0036
Mingers, J., & Willcocks, L. (2014). An integrative semiotic framework for information systems: The social, personal and material worlds. Information and Organization, 24(1), 48–70. doi:10.1016/j.infoandorg.2014.01.002
Molin, A., & Hirche, S. (2014). A bi-level approach for the design of event-triggered control systems over a shared network. Discrete Event Dynamic Systems, 24(2), 153–171. doi:10.1007/s10626-012-0156-9
Naef, M., Staadt, O., & Gross, M. (2005). Multimedia integration into the blue-c API. Computers & Graphics, 29(1), 3–15. doi:10.1016/j.cag.2004.11.003
O’hara, K., Kjeldskov, J., & Paay, J. (2011). Blended interaction spaces for distributed team collaboration. ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, 18(1), 1–28. doi:10.1145/1959022.1959025
O’Neil, M. (2014). Hacking Weber: legitimacy, critique, and trust in peer production. Information, Communication & Society, 17(7), 872–888. doi:10.1080/1369118X.2013.850525
Papa, F., & Spedaletti, S. (2001). Broadband cellular radio telecommunication technologies in distance learning: a human factors field study. Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 5(4), 231–242.
Paul, C. (2002). Renderings of Digital Art. Leonardo, 35(5), 471–474.
Payne, R. (2004). Virtually: The Refreshment of Interface Value. Postmodern Culture, 14(3). doi:10.1353/pmc.2004.0027
Petralia, P. (2011). Here, there and in-between: rehearsing over Skype. Performance Research, 16(3), 113–116.
Picard, R. W., & Cosier, G. (1997). Affective intelligence—the missing link? BT Technology Journal, 15(4), 151–162.
Plautz, D. (2005). New Ideas Emerge When Collaboration Occurs. Leonardo, 38(4), 302–309.
Poissant, L. (2002). Part VI: Telematics. Leonardo, 35(4), 439–443.
Pyöriä, P. (2009). Virtual collaboration in knowledge work: from vision to reality. Team Performance Management, 15(7/8), 366–381. doi:10.1108/13527590911002140
Raley, R. (2003). Statistical Material: Globalization and the Digital Art of John Klima. CR: The New Centennial Review, 3(2), 67–89. doi:10.1353/ncr.2003.0026
Rhee, S.-M., Ziegler, R., Park, J., Naef, M., Gross, M., & Kim, M.-H. (2007). Low-cost telepresence for collaborative virtual environments. Visualization and Computer Graphics, IEEE Transactions on, 13(1), 156–166.
Rhoads, M. (2010). Face-to-Face and Computer-Mediated Communication: What Does Theory Tell Us and What Have We Learned so Far? Journal of Planning Literature, 25(2), 111–122. doi:10.1177/0885412210382984
Riva, G. (2009). Is presence a technology issue? Some insights from cognitive sciences. Virtual Reality, 13(3), 159–169. doi:10.1007/s10055-009-0121-6
Rodríguez-Ardura, I., & Martínez-López, F. J. (2014). Another look at “being there” experiences in digital media: Exploring connections of telepresence with mental imagery. Computers in Human Behavior, 30, 508–518. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2013.06.016
Sallnäs, E.-L., Rassmus-Gröhn, K., & Sjöström, C. (2000). Supporting presence in collaborative environments by haptic force feedback. ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction (TOCHI), 7(4), 461–476.
Sanders, J. H., & Udoka, S. J. (2010). An Information Provision Framework for Performance-Based Interactive eLearning Application for Manufacturing. Simulation & Gaming, 41(4), 511–536. doi:10.1177/1046878109334332
Schleyer, T. K. L. (2001). Collaboratories: leveraging information technology for cooperative research. Journal of Dental Research, 80(6).
Schubert, T. W. (2009). A New Conception of Spatial Presence: Once Again, with Feeling. Communication Theory, 19(2), 161–187. doi:10.1111/j.1468-2885.2009.01340.x
Scott Matthews, H., Morawski, T. B., Nagengast, A. L., O’Reilly, G. P., Picklesimer, D. D., Sackett, R. A., & Wu, P. P. (2010). Planning energy-efficient and eco-sustainable telecommunications networks. Bell Labs Technical Journal, 15(1), 215–236. doi:10.1002/bltj.20434
Sermon, P. (2007). The Teleporter Zone: Interactive Media Arts in the Healthcare Context. Leonardo, 40(5), 426–431.
Shimizu, T., Shirai, D., Takahashi, H., Murooka, T., Obana, K., Tonomura, Y., … Smarr, L. (2006). International real-time streaming of 4K digital cinema. Future Generation Computer Systems, 22(8), 929–939. doi:10.1016/j.future.2006.04.001
Singh, V. K., Pirsiavash, H., Rishabh, I., & Jain, R. (2009). Towards Environment-to-Environment (E2E) multimedia communication systems. Multimedia Tools and Applications, 44(3), 361–388. doi:10.1007/s11042-009-0281-0
Smed, J., Kaukoranta, T., & Hakonen, H. (2002). Aspects of networking in multiplayer computer games. Electronic Library, The, 20(2), 87–97.
Software Engineering: The Next 50 Years. (n.d.). Retrieved June 6, 2014, from http://blog.ninlabs.com/2013/12/software-engineering-the-next-50-years/
Strengers, Y. (2014). Meeting in the Global Workplace: Air Travel, Telepresence and the Body. Mobilities, 1–17. doi:10.1080/17450101.2014.902655
Syneme. (n.d.). Retrieved June 6, 2014, from http://syneme.ucalgary.ca/tiki/tiki-index.php
Tasa, U. B., & Görgülü, T. (2010). Meta-art: art of the 3-D user-created virtual worlds. Digital Creativity, 21(2), 100–111. doi:10.1080/14626261003786251
Tofts, D. J. (2003). “The World Will Be Tlon”: Mapping the Fantastic onto the Virtual. Postmodern Culture, 13(2). doi:10.1353/pmc.2003.0011
Toshima, I., & Aoki, S. (2014). Perception of delay time of head movement in using an acoustical telepresence robot: TeleHead. Advanced Robotics, 1–8. doi:10.1080/01691864.2014.906911
Traub, P. (2005). Sounding the net: Recent sonic works for the internet and computer networks. Contemporary Music Review, 24(6), 459–481. doi:10.1080/07494460500296136
Trippett, D. (2014). Facing Digital Realities: Where Media Do Not Mix. Cambridge Opera Journal, 26(01), 41–64. doi:10.1017/S0954586713000311
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Van der Kleij, R., Paashuis, R. M., Langefeld (Anja), J. J., & Schraagen, J. M. C. (2004). Effects of long-term use of video-communication technologies on the conversational process. Cognition, Technology & Work, 6(1), 57–59. doi:10.1007/s10111-003-0146-7
Vickery, L. (2011). The Possibilities of Novel Formal Structures through Computer Controlled Live Performance. Retrieved from http://ro.ecu.edu.au/ecuworks2011/423/
Vickery, L. (2012). The Evolution of Notational Innovations from the Mobile Score to the Screen Score. Organised Sound, 17(02), 128–136. doi:10.1017/S1355771812000052
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Zimmermann, R., Chew, E., Ay, S. A., & Pawar, M. (2008). Distributed musical performances: Architecture and stream management. ACM Transactions on Multimedia Computing, Communications, and Applications, 4(2), 1–23. doi:10.1145/1352012.1352018

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Telematic Performance

Key Reading:
Further Resources:

Books and Articles

Reactive Environment for Network Music Performance
Dalia El-Shimy
Jeremy R. Cooperstock

Alexandraki, C.; Koutlemanis, P.; Gasteratos, P.; Valsamakis, N.; Akoumianakis, D.; Milolidakis, G.; Vellis, G.; Kotsalis, D.; (2008). "Towards the implementation of a generic platform for networked music performance: The DIAMOUSES approach". EProceedings of the ICMC 2008 International Computer Music Conference (ICMC 2008). pp. 251–258.
Oda, R., A. Finkelstein and R. Fiebrink (2013). "Towards Note-Level Prediction for Networked Music Performance." New Interfaces for Musical Expression, Daejeon, Korea.

Bischoff, J., Gold, R. and Horton, J. (1978) “Music for an Interactive Network of Microcomputers.” Computer Music Journal, 2(3): 24–29.

Hiltz, S. R. and Turoff, M. (1978) The network nation: Human communication via computer. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Nora, S. and Minc, A. (1980) The Computerization of Society. Cambridge: MIT Press.
  • where the term ‘telematics’ was first coined

Novak, M. (1997) “Trans Terra Form: Liquid Architectures and the Loss of Inscription.” Online article.

Ascott, R. (1998) Art & Telematics: toward the Construction of New Aesthetics. (Japanese trans. E. Fujihara; A. Takada & Y. Yamashita eds.). Tokyo: NTT Publishing Co.

Scot Gresham-Lancaster. (1998) “The Aesthetics and History of the Hub: The Effects of Changing Technology on Network Computer Music”. Leonardo Music Journal, 8: 39-44.
  • “The author, a member of the group the Hub, discusses the aesthetic and performance history of the group and related San Francisco Bay Area live interactive music performance practices. The performance practice of the Hub--interactive computer network music--is discussed. Particular focus is placed on the impact of changes in technology. Future applications and directions of this musical approach are discussed.”

Konstantas, D. (1998) “Overview of a Telepresence Environment for Distributed Musical Rehearsals.” In Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on Applied Computing, p. 135-37. Atlanta, GA: ACM.

Duckworth, W. (1999) “Making Music on the Web.” Leonardo Music Journal, 9: 13–17.

Garnett, G., and C. Goudeseune. (1999) “Performance Factors in Control of High-Dimensional Spaces.” In Proceedings of the 1999 International Computer Music Conference. San Francisco: International Computer Music Association, p. 268–271.

Jordà, S. (1999) “Faust Music On Line (FMOL): An Approach to Real-Time Collective Composition on the Internet.” Leonardo Music Journal, 9: 5–12.

Shanken, Edward A. (2000) “Tele-Agency: Telematics, Telerobotics, and the Art of Meaning. Available online.
  • “The human and political implications of agency, especially with respect to technology, demand that agency be problematized as it relates to telematics and telerobotics. By analyzing artworks that use these telecommunications technologies, it is possible to differentiate between various models of agency and suggest their epistemological and ontological implications.”

Castells, M. (2000) The rise of the network society. The information age: Economy, society and culture, 2nd ed. Vol. I. Cambridge, MA/Oxford: Blackwell.

Castells, M. (2000) “Materials for an Exploratory Theory of the Network Society.” British Journal of Sociology, 51(1): 5-24.

Chafe, C., Wilson, S., Leistikow, R., Chisholm, D., Scavone, G. (2000) “Simplified Approach to High Quality Music and Sound over IP.” In Proceedings of the Digital Audio Effects (DAFX) Conference, p. 159–164.

Tanaka, Atau. (2001) “Musical implications of media and network infrastructures: Perturbations of traditional artistic roles.” In Actes de H2PTM'01: Hypertextes hypermédias, nouvelles écritures, nouveaux langages, (Balpe, J.-P., Leleu-Merveil, S. et al, eds.), p. 241-250. Université de Valenciennes Lavoisier: Hermes Science Publications.
  • The influence of hypermedia on musical artistic practice is considered. Qualities unique to hyperlink listener interaction and network infrastructure are taken as the fundamental basis to define a musical language for the medium. Network topology creates a space distinct from the time-specific event space traditionally associated with musical performance. Hypermedia access makes the listener a participant in an evolutionary compositional process. This situation puts in question traditional roles of composer and performer. Two network music works are discussed, an installation that juxtaposes network and acoustic space, and a net.audio project where the composer's role becomes one of creating an empty musical shell.

Tanaka, Atau. (2001) “Relier l'espace matériel et l'espace immatériel: Les projets de musique en réseau en 2000.” Dossiers de l'audiovisuel, p. 61-64.

Joy, Jérôme. (2001) "Les dispositifs coopératifs, prospective 21ème siècle." In Volume ! - Autour des musiques actuelles. La Chapelle-sur-Erdre : Éditions Mélanie Seteun.

Shanken, Edward A. (2001) “Technology and Intuition: A Love Story? Roy Ascott's Telematic Embrace.” Online article.

Shanken, Edward A. (2001?) "Telematic Embrace: A Love Story? Roy Ascott's Theories of Telematic Art." Online article.

Garnett, G. (2001) “The Aesthetics of Interactive Computer Music.” Computer Music Journal, 25(1): 21–33.

Lazzaro, J., Wawrzynek, J. (2001) “A Case for Network Musical Performance.” The 11th International Workshop on Network and Operating Systems Support for Digital Audio and Video (NOSSDAV 2001), New York, USA.

Brown, C. and Bischoff, J. (2002?) "Indigenous to the Net: Early network music bands in the San Francisco Bay area." Online article.

Broeckmann, A. (2002) "Reseau/Resonance: Connective processes and artistic practice". Artmedia VIII.

Joy, Jérôme. (2002) "Construction de situations collectives d'invention, homestudios et dispositifs audio en réseau." In Volume ! - Autour des musiques actuelles, 2002 n°2: 19-42. Clermont-Ferrand : Éditions Mélanie Seteun.

Weinberg, G. (2002) “The Aesthetics, History and Future Challenges of Interconnected Music Networks.” In Proceedings of the 2002 ICMC (Goteburg, Sweden), p. 349-356.

Hajdu, G. (2003) “Quintet.net – A Quintet on the Internet.” In Proceedings of the International Computer Music Conference (Singapore).

Tanzi, D. (2003) “Musical Experience and On-line Communication.” Crossings: eJournal of Art and Technology. University of Dublin, Trinity College.

Shaviro, Steven. (2003) Connected –or what it means to live in the network society. Minneapolis/London: University of Minnesota Press.

Tanaka, A. (2003) “Seeking interaction, changing space.” In Proceedings of the Sixth International Art + Communication Festival 2003. Riga, Latvia.

Chew, E. (2003) From remote media immersion to distributed immersive performance.” In Proceedings of the 2003 ACM SIGMM Workshop on Experiential Telepresence, p.110–120. Berkeley, CA: SIGMM.

Ascott, Roy. (2003) Telematic Embrace: Visionary Theories of Art, Technology, and Consciousness (Edward A. Shanken, ed.). Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.
  • “In Telematic Embrace Edward A. Shanken gathers, for the first time, an impressive compilation of more than three decades of Ascott’s philosophies on aesthetics, interactivity, and the sense of self and community in the telematic world of cyberspace. This book explores Ascott’s ideas on how networked communication has shaped behavior and consciousness within and beyond the realm of what is conventionally defined as art.”

Barbosa, Alvaro. (2003) “Displaced Soundscapes: A Survey of Network Systems for Music and Sonic Art Creation”. Leonardo Music Journal, Vol. 13: 53-59. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Joy, J. (2003–2005). Télémusique—organologie de la musique en réseau (part of PhD research).

Weinberg, G. (2003) “Interconnected Musical Networks: Bringing Expression and Thoughtfulness to Collaborative Group Playing.” Thesis, MIT Media Laboratory, Cambridge, MA.

Rebelo, P. (2003). “Performing Space.” Organised Sound, 8(2): 181-86. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • “The notion of performance is introduced as a design approach to the creation of interactive digital environments. These environments can ultimately be regarded asuser-spaces; a condition which replace the art object with a configuration of interactions. Our understanding of space, as suggested by Lefevbre, defines the “inhabitant” as a full participant, a user, a performer of space. Two interactive installations by the author and works by others in the field provide a context for discussion and analysis.”

Barney, D. (2004) The Network Society. Cambridge, UK: Polity Press Ltd.

Chew, E., Zimmermann, R., Sawchuk, A., Papadopoulos, C., Kyriakakis, C., Francois, A. R. J., Kim, G., and Volk, A. (2004) “Musical interaction at a distance: Distributed immersive performance.” In 4th Open Workshop of MUSICNETWORK.

Joy, Jérôme. (2004) "Dispositifs artistiques coopératifs (Collective JukeBox, picNIC, PacJap, ForumHub, etc.) (Vernetzte Audiosysteme)". In Neue Zeitschrift: NetzMusik/NetMusic (sous la directions de Golo Föllmer). Berlin: Éditions Wergo, p. 29-30. Revue et cd-rom.

Tanaka, A et al. (2004) “Enhancing Musical Experience through Proximal Interaction.” In Proceedings of the International Computer Music Conference (Miami, USA).
  • The availability of audio content on networks has indelibly changed access to music. We extend this dynamic to wireless ad-hoc networks and present the use of dual infrastructures to extend modes of personal and interpersonal music listening. We identify two distinct forms proximal interaction, sequential and parallel, and demonstrate a musical application for each. Mobile handheld terminals become prototypical future personal music players. They situate the listener in a wireless network space, helping him to define a personal musical sphere with respect to his architectural and social surroundings.

Gurevich, M., Chafe, C., Leslie, G., Tyan, S. (2004) “Simulation of Networked Ensemble Performance with Varying Time Delays: Characterization of Ensemble Accuracy.” Centre for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics, Department of Music, Stanford University.

Chafe, C., Gurevich, M., Leslie, G., Tyan, S. (2004) “Effect of Time Delay on Ensemble Accuracy”. In Proceedings of the International Symposium on Musical Acoustics, ISMA2004 (Nara, Japan).

Tanaka, Atau. (2004) From Telepresence to Co-experience: A Decade of Network Music.” Neue Zeitschrift (Golo Foellmer, ed.).

Hajdu, G. (2004) "Quintet.Net: An interactive performance environment for the Internet." Online article.

Tanaka, A. (2004) “Mobile music making.” In Proceedings of the 2004 International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression (NIME04), p.154–156. Hamamatsu: NIME.

Chew, E., Kyriakakis, C., Papadopoulos, C., Sawchuk, A. and Zimmermann, R. (2004) Distributed immersive performance: Enabling Technologies for and Analyses of Remote Performance and Collaboration.” Online article.

Tanaka, A., Tokui, N., and Momeni, A. (2005) Facilitating Collective Musical Creativity.” In Proceedings of ACM Multimedia.

Munster, A. and Lovink, G. (2005) "Theses on distributed aesthetics. Or, what a network is not." Fibreculture, 7.

Föllmer, G. (2005) "Electronic, aesthetic and social factors in Net music." Organised Sound, 10(3): 185–192.

Föllmer, G. (2005) Netzmusik. Elektronische, ästhetische und soziale Strukturen einer partizipativen Musik. Hofheim: Wolke.

Duckworth, W. (2005) Virtual music: How the Web got wired for sound. London: Routledge.

Weinberg, G. (2005)Interconnected musical networks: Toward a theoretical framework.” Computer Music Journal, 29(2): 23–39.

Btihaj, A. (2005) "Disembodiment and cyberspace: A phenomenological approach." Electronic Journal of Sociology.

Hajdu, G. (2005b) "Quintet.net: An environment for composing and performing music on the Internet." Leonardo Journal, 38: 23–30.

Gu, X., Dick, M., Kurtisi, Z., Noyer, U. and Wolf, L. (2005) “Network-centric music performance: Practice and experiments.” IEEE Communications, 43:86–93.

Tanzi, D. (2005) “Musical objects and digital domains.” In Proceedings of the EMS-05 Conference (Montreal, Quebec).

Tanzi, D. (2005) “Musical Thought Networked.” Laboratorio di Informatica Musicale, Dipartimento di informatica e Comunicazione, Universita degli Studi di Milano.

Lee, R (2005) “Bauman, Liquid Modernity and Dilemmas of Development.” Thesis Eleven, 83(1): 61-77.

Gaye, L., Holmquist, L-E., Behrendt, F., Tanaka, A. (2006) “Mobile Music Technology: Report on an Emerging Community.” In Proceedings of the International Conference of New Interfaces for Musical Expression (NIME06). IRCAM.
  • The new field of mobile music emerges at the intersection of ubiquitous computing, portable audio technology and NIME. We have held a series of international workshop on this topic with leading projects and speakers, in order to establish a community and stimulate the development of the field. In this report, we define mobile music, and map out the field by reporting on the workshop series and accounting for the state-of-the-art.

Tanaka, A. (2006) Interaction, Agency, Experience, and the Future of Music.In Consuming Music Together: Social and Collaborative Aspects of Music Consumption Technologies, Computer Supported Cooperative Work (O’Hara, K. and Brown, B., eds.). Springer, p. 267-288.

Carôt, A., Renaud, A. and Verbrugghe, B. (2006) “Network Music Performance (NMP) with Soundjack.” Paper presented at the NIME 2006 Network Performance Workshop.

Renaud, A., and Rebelo, P. (2006) “Network Performance: Strategies and Applications.” In Proceedings of the 2006 International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression (Paris, France).
  • “The Sonic Arts Research Centre (SARC) in Belfast has started to work on developing innovative approaches to the use of networks in music performance in composition, with the aim to make NMP systems as widespread and usable as possible. Much network performance research has as its goal the replication of existing performance conditions. This paper explores some possibilities in redefining relationships between musicians, performers and composers, performers and audience, performers and spaces. The aims of this research is to identify performance conditions that are only possible through the network and to reflect on how the network is changing the way we create and consume music. The paper describes different scenarios that take advantage of real-time high quality audio exchange over the internet.”

Rebelo, P. and Renaud, A. (2006) “The Frequencyliator – Distributing Structures for Networked Laptop Improvisation.” In Proceedings of the 2006 International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression (Paris, France).
  • “The culture of laptop improvisation has grown tremendously in recent years. The development of personalized software instruments presents interesting issues in the context of improvised group performances. This paper examines an approach that is aimed at increasing the modes of interactivity between laptop performers and at the same time suggests ways in which audiences can better discern and identify the sonic characteristics of each laptop performer. We refer to software implementation that was developed for the BLISS networked laptop ensemble with view to designing a shared format for the exchange of messages within local and internet based networks.”

Kleimola, J. (2006) “Latency Issues in Distributed Musical Performance.” Telecommunication Software and Multimedia Labroratory Seminar, Helsinki, Finland.

Grant, M. J. (2007) "Review: Golo Föllmer, Netzmusik: Elektronische, ästhetische und soziale Strukturen einer partizipativen Musik." Computer Music Journal, 31(1): 100-102.

Tanaka, A. (2007)Facilitating musical creativity: In collectivity and mobility.” Leonardo Electronic Almanac, 15: 5-6.

Renaud, A., Carôt, A. and Rebelo, P. (2007) “Networked music performance: State of the art.” Paper presented at the 30th AES International Conference (Saariselkä, Finland).

Renaud, A. and Caceres, J. (2007) "Network performance: Experiences and current directions". Paper presented at the ‘Two Thousand + SEVEN’ Symposium (SARC, Belfast).

Mejías, Ulises Ali. (2007) “Networked Proximity: Icts and the Mediation of Nearness.” PhD Thesis. Teachers College, Columbia University.

Schroeder, F., Renaud, A., Rebelo, P. and Gualdas, F. (2007) “Addressing the Network: Performative Strategies for Playing Apart”. In Proceedings of the ICMC (Copenhagen, Denmark), p. 133-140.
  • This paper describes a recent network music performance (NMP) study that was carried out at the Sonic Arts Research Centre in Belfast in March 2007.

Carôt, A., and Werner, C. (2007) “Network music performance – problems, approaches and perspectives.” In Proceedings of the “Music in the Global Village” Conference, Budapest, Hungary.

Rebelo, P., Green, M., Hollerweger, F. (2008) “A Typology for Listening in Place.” Mobile Music Workshop.
  • Sound technologies, particularly mobile and locative media technologies, can provide unique listening experiences within situations that are not themselves exclusive zonesfor sonic projection, meditation or exploration. This paper seeks to contribute to the understanding of locative sound design by presenting a framework consisting of three spatial archetypes: the Theatre, the Museum and the City. These serve as metaphors through which we can articulate different types of relations between listener, sound and place. The Mobile Music Player has been chosen as an example of a listeningcondition that both characterises and traverses the Theatre, the Museum and the City listening archetypes.

Rebelo, P., Schroeder, F. and Renaud, A. B. (2008) “Network dramaturgy: Being on the node.” In Proceedings of the International Computer Music Conference (SARC, Belfast, N. Ireland).

Caceres, J-P., Hamilton, R., Iyer, D., Chafe, C. and Wang, G. (2008) “To the Edge with China: Explorations in Network Performance”. ARTECH 2008, 4th International Conference on Digital Arts (Portuguese Catholic University, Porto).

J.-P. Caceres and A. B. Renaud. (2008) “Playing the network: the use of time delays as musical devices.” In Proceedings of International Computer Music Conference (SARC, Belfast, Northern Ireland), p. 244–250.

Joy, J. and Sinclair, S. (2008) “Les Espaces Sonores en Réseau”. In Roots/routes: International Computer Music Conference, p. 553–555. (SARC, Belfast, Ireland).

Bahn, C., Braasch, J., Kouttron, D., McDonald, K. and Oliveros, P. (2008)Haptic communication and colocated performance (A).” Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 124: 2489

Tanaka A. (2008) “Visceral mobile music systems.” In Transdisciplinary Digital Art: Sound, Vision and the New Screen. Berlin: Springer, p. 155-170.

Tanaka A, Gemeinboeck P. (2008) “Net_Dérive: Conceiving and Producing a Locative Media Artwork.” In Mobile Technologies: From Telecommunications to Media
(Goggin, G., Hjorth, L., eds.). Oxford, UK: Routledge.

Akoumianakis, D. (2008) “Distributed collective practices in collaborative music performance.” Paper presented at the Third ACM International Conference on Digital Interactive Media in Entertainment and Arts (DIMEA 2008).

Joy, J. and Sinclair, P. 2008. "Networked Sonic Spaces". In Proceedings of the International Computer Music Conference ICMC'08 (SARC, Belfast, N. Ireland) dans le cadre du panel "Networking Performance" (Andrew Gerszo, Georg Hadju, Pauline Oliveros, Robert Rowe, Jonas Braasch, Chris Chafe, Pedro Rebelo, Alain Renaud, Gualterio Volpe, Winfried Ritsch, Andrea Cera, Miller Puckette, Peter Sinclair, Jerome Joy).

Joy, J. and Sinclair, P. (2009) "Espaces Sonores en Réseau - pratiques de la recherche en art — Locus Sonus." In Recherche & Création - Art, Technologie, Pédagogie, Innovation, sous la direction de Samuel Bianchini. Paris: Éditions Burozoïque / Les Éditions du Parc, École Nationale Supérieure d’Art de Nancy, p. 122-139.

Schroeder, F. and Rebelo, P. (2009) “Sounding the Network: The Body as Disturbant.” Leonardo Electronic Almanac, 16: 4-5.
  • “This paper investigates the network as a site for music performance; in particular, the net’s performative conditions with the tightly linked notion of community are exposed through the medium of music as an intrinsic social practice. The paper provides a brief cultural overview of the development of the network metaphor before problematizing perspectival views of the network. By reflecting on the development of social web environments and its fragmentary nature, the authors examine the scattered viewpoints that characterize the network. The authors question the idealized view of an all-connectedness and position the human body as an interrupter of the network. In this line of thinking, the idealized models of connectivity and communication of the network become questioned. Instead, the authors look toward music performance and propose a re-thinking of this communication model and argue for a framework that, contrary to the often holistic approach to performing in the net, favors glances, fragments and desires.”

Oliveros, P., Weaver, S., Dresser, M., Pitcher, J., Braasch, J., and Chafe, C. (2009) “Telematic Music: Six Perspectives”. Online supplement to Leonardo Music Journal Vol. 19.
  • The six authors of this paper participated in a telematic concert between Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York, Stanford University in Stanford, California, and University of California San Diego in November 2007. They subsequently formed the Telematic Music Panel for the International Society for Improvised Music conference later that year. Each gives their perspective on the concert and their role within in it.

Jo K., Tanaka A. (2009) “The Music One Participates In.” Performing Technology: User Content and the New Digital Media (Schroeder, F., ed.). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 34-50.

Caceres, J.-P. and Chafe, C. (2009) “JackTrip: Under the hood of an engine for network audio.” In Proceedings of International Computer Music Conference (Montreal, Canada).

Carôt, A. (2009) “Musical Telepresence - A Comprehensive Analysis Towards New Cognitive and Technical Approaches.” PhD. Dissertation, Institute of Telematics,
Lubeck, Germany.

Renaud, A. (2009) “The Network as a Performance Space.” PhD. Dissertation, School of Music and Sonic Arts, Queen’s University, Belfast.

Bannier, S. (2009) “The Musical Network 2.0 & 3.0.” Studies on Media Information & Telecommunication. Interdisciplinary Institute for Broadband Technology, Brussels, Belgium.

Rebelo, Pedro. (2010) “Notating the Unpredictable.” Contemporary Music Review, 29(1): 17-27.
  • Notation can be seen to sit conformably between theory and practice as it symbolizes practice, generates and implements theory, and produces practice. Historically, its presence changes in significance across the development of activities such as music or architecture. From design tool to canonic text, notational artefacts both solidify and formalize practice, as will be expanded below. How, then, does the role and function of notation change with specific contemporary practices, which are by definition ill-defined and feed off fluidity and change? What is the nature of notation in distributed and collaborative practices such as improvised music or network music performance?

Joy, Jérôme. (2010) "Une Époque Circuitée - (Faire de la musique ensemble) — Réflexion sur l'organologie des arts en réseau : le passage de l'Internet à un état musical." In Programmer / Programming''', Intermédialités: Revue d'Histoire et Théorie des Arts, des Lettres et des Techniques, No. 13: 57-76. CRI Centre de recherche sur l'intermédialité, Université de Montréal.

Tanaka A, Gaye L, Richardson R. (2010) “Co-production and Co-creation: Creative Practice in Social Inclusion.” In Cultural Computing: Second IFIP TC 14 Entertainment Computing Symposium (ECS). Brisbane, Australia: Springer.

Gaye L, Tanaka A, Richardson R, Jo K. (2010) “Social inclusion through the digital economy: Digital creative engagement and youth-led innovation.” In 9th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children (IDC). Barcelona, Spain: ACM Press.

Vitale, C. (2010) “Networkologies - A Manifesto – Section I.” Speculations Online Journal, 1: 153-184.

Hamilton, R., Caceres, J-P., Nanou, C. and Platz, C. (2011) Multi-modal musical environments for mixed-reality performance”. Journal for Multimodal User Interfaces, 4: 147-156.

Chaves, R. and Rebelo, P. (2011) “Sensing Shared Places: Designing a mobile audio streaming environment”. Body, Space & Technology Journal, 10:1.
  • “This paper addresses mobile audio streaming in the context of sharing a sense of place. This action is mediated by the network, the body and remote listening. These elements are essential in the concept and design of a platform for audio transmission (liveshout), that aims at intersecting mobility within the realms of radio, network and transmission art.”

Joy, Jérôme (2011) "What NMSAT says about sonification." In Revue AI & Society : Knowledge, Culture and Communication (Locus Sonus, éditeur invité/ Guest editor),
Issue 2011. London : Springer UK.

Khattar, Cynthia. (2011) "Concerto en Réseau Majeur (Télémusique — Musique en Réseau)". In Hémisphères [La Revue Suisse de la Recherche et de ses Applications]: L'Intelligence des Réseaux, 1: 62-63. Haute École Spécialisée de Suisse Occidentale HES SO, University of Applied Sciences Western Switzerland.

Weaver, Sarah. (2011). "Latency: Music Composition and Technology Solutions for Perception of Synchrony in “ResoNations 2010: An International Telematic Music Concert for Peace.” Master's thesis, New York University.

Vitale, C. (2011) “On the Metaphysics and Physics of the Networkological Endeavor: An Introduction.” Speculations: The Journal of Speculative Realism, Vol. 2.

Vitale, C. (pending) Networkologies: A New Philosophy of Networks for a Hyperconnected Age, Vol. I-III. Zero Books. Online excerpts.

Vitale, C. (work-in-progress) “The Networked Mind: Cognitive Science, Artificial Intelligence, and Post-Structuralist Philosophy.” Online manuscript.


Dedicated Journal Issues

__//Organised Sound//, Vol 17, no. 1 (2012): Networked Electroacoustic Music__

Whalley, I. (2012) "Internet2 and Global Electroacoustic Music: Navigating a decision space of production, relationships and languages", p. 4-15.
Mills, R. and Beilharz, K. (2012) "Listening Through the Firewall: Semiotics of sound in networked improvisation", p. 16-27.
Makelberge, N. (2012) "Rethinking Collaboration in Networked Music" p. 28-35.
Hayes, L. and Michalakos, C. (2012) "Imposing a Networked Vibrotactile Communication System for Improvisational Suggestion", p. 36-44.
Burtner, M., Kemper, S. and Topper, D. (2012) "Network Socio-Synthesis and Emergence in NOMADS", p. 45-55.
Ogborn, D. (2012) "Composing for a Networked, Pulse-Based Laptop Orchestra", p. 56-61.
Vallis, O., Diakopoulos, D., Hochenbaum, J. and Kapur, A. (2012) "Building on the Foundations of Network Music: Exploring interaction contexts and shared robotic instruments", p. 62-72.
Gremo, B. P. (2012) "Tele-Media and Instrument Making", p. 73-85.
Fields, K. (2012) "Syneme: Live", p. 86-95.


Contemporary Music Review, Vol. 28, Issues 4-5 (2009): Special Issue: Network Performance

Hajdu, G. and Didkovsky, N. (2009) “On the Evolution of Music Notation in Network Music Environments”, p. 395-407.
Schroeder, Franziska. (2009) “Dramaturgy as a Model for Geographically Displaced Collaborations: Views from Within and Views from Without”, p. 377–385.
Oliveros, Pauline. (2009) “Networked Music: Low and High Tech.”, p. 433-435.
Chafe, Chris. (2009) “Tapping into the Internet as an Acoustical/Musical Medium”, p. 413-420.
Braasch, Jonas. (2009) “The Telematic Music System: Affordances for a New Instrument to Shape the Music of Tomorrow”, p. 421–432.
Joy, Jérôme. (2009) “Networked Music & Soundart Timeline (NMSAT) Excerpts of Part One: Ancient and Modern History, Anticipatory Literature, and Technical Developments References”, p. 449-490.
Puckette, Miller. (2009) “Not Being There”, p. 409–412.
Joy, J. and Sinclair, P. (2009) “Networked Music and Soundart Timeline (NMSAT): A Panoramic View of Practices and Techniques Related to Sound Transmission and Distance Listening”, p. 351-361.
Kim-Boyle, David. (2009) “Network Musics: Play, Engagement and the Democratization of Performance”, p. 363-375.
Rebelo, Pedro. (2009) “Dramaturgy in the Network”, p. 387-393.


Other Resources

NMSAT Timeline (Networked Music and Sound Art Timeline - Jérôme Joy, PhD candidate, Université de Laval)

Sarah Weaver (composer/conductor; specialist in telematic music - PhD student at Stony Brook University, NY)

BACK TO TOP

DH: Possibilities and Challenges of telepresence/live interaction over networks

Key Reading:

Piccini, Angela. (2009). Locating Grid Technologies: Performativity, Place, Space: Challenging the Institutionalized Spaces of e-Science.
Digital Humanities Quarterly, 3(4). http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/3/4/000076/000076.html
Keywords: Workshop, time and space, technologies, e-Science, performativity, place, practice-based research, grid technologies

The author describes the research workshop series Performativity, Place, Space which is aimed to investigate how the technologies of e-Science might “inform new understandings of space and time for distributed, creative research practices”. The author reviews the history of e-Science with a focus on the “large-scale, distributed collaborative research enabled through the Internet” rather than high performance computing; explores e-Science in the Screen and Performing Arts noting the current use of technology such as with works coming out of the ZKM; provides an overview of the Locating Grid technologies workshop that explored e-Science tools rather than the established performance media software such as MaxMSP, PureData , and Isodora; and explored Collaboration, tools and Infrastructure noting “fragmentations of space and time in networked environments”; explored Fragmentation and Mapping of performers noting that “(t)he recording, mapping and annotating of fragmented performance brings to the fore those exact qualities of the live event that escape documentation”. The author describes each workshop in the series noting what was revealed .



Further Resources:

Castricano, Jodey. (2011). "Testing the Limits": What Happens When Digital Humanities Meets Alternative Worldviews. Digital Studies, 2(2).
http://www.digitalstudies.org/ojs/index.php/digital_studies/article/view/181/249#d1e365
Abstract:
"Testing the Limits" reflects upon the implications of a conceptual paradigm shift in theoretical approaches to the use of immersive technologies in a postcolonial, post-positivistic world. This reflection means bringing into proximity alternative explanatory models of "reality"—such as the indigenous philosophy of Leroy Little Bear where it relates to Western science, David Peat's thoughts on quantum theory and his collaboration with Leroy Little Bear, and the theory of synchronicity as developed by Carl G. Jung in collaboration with physicist Wolfgang Pauli—where these models open into alternative worldviews which offer a hypothetical rapprochement in the history of consciousness between science and art. This study, therefore, focuses less on the use of immersive technology in the Humanities than on the instrumentality of theory itself in constructing perceptual models of reality (including scientific and artistic worldviews), especially where it is "virtual" and where it needs to consider diverse philosophies, scientific theories and representations of space/time in relation to subjectivities. To illustrate this claim, the media work by Canadian artist Char Davies will be offered as a case study; Davies has gone on record seeking to subvert the visual aesthetic in VR and 3D computer graphics, which, in striving for "ever great photo realism," serves only to reinforce "the Cartesian divide between dominating subject and passive object." It is relevant in the context of this essay that Char Davies is a software developer and artist whose work is informed not only by her understanding of the history of consciousness in Western metaphysics, but also by her understanding of the relation of such history to quantum theory.

Jarmon, Leslie. (2010). Homo Virtualis: Virtual Worlds,learning, and an Ecology of Embodied Interaction. International Journal of Virtual and Personal Learning Environments, 1(1), pgs 38-56.
http://citep.rec.uba.ar/ubatic/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/Journal-of-Virtual-and-Personal-Learning-Environment.pdf#page=45

Abstract: This article previews the emergence of homo virtualis. Drawing on data from seven research studies, peer-reviewed published research articles, and selected excerpts of 30 months of field notes taken in Second Life, the article examines virtual learning environments and embodiment through the lens of interactions of avatars with other avatars, virtual objects, landscapes, sounds, and spatial constructs. Analysis is grounded in the polyvocal evidence provided by select participants who experienced a sense of embodied co-presence and connection with others across geo-physical distances. The discourse ranges from that of high school girls, professional retirees, toxicology and design undergraduates, interdisciplinary graduate students, to educators and researchers from K-12 through university full professors collaborating in SL. In an ecology of virtual contexts, learners inhabit a broader landscape of their own and others’ making that allows them to be teachers, designers, researchers, communicators, and collaborators.

Kelly, V.H. (2011) Instructional design practices in the design and development of Digital Humanities virtual environments (DH-VEs). Ph.D. thesis, Capella University.
Abstract:
Virtual environments, virtual worlds, simulations, 3D models are loaded with potential, promise, and problems. While learning in virtual settings is still being researched, instructional designers are challenged as to which instructional design practices are best suited for virtual environments (VEs). The problem is there is a lack of a conceptual or analytical framework in which to inspire instructional design. Through VEs, Humanities scholars and learners are able to experience ancient cultures and artifacts, as they existed centuries ago--a privilege previously impossible prior to the digitization of ancient environments. This research study briefly examines various types of learning conducive to Digital Humanities virtual environments (DH-VEs) and expounds on the instructional design behind the scenes that make possible the creation of such vivid environments. Through a review of recent literature, it is unknown if (and what types of) traditional instructional design practices are being used in the development of DH-VEs. The purpose of this study was to solicit expert opinion for the purpose of reporting a set of recommendations for effective instructional design practices used in the design and development of DH-VEs. Also included in this study are conclusions and implications regarding the instructional design of DH-VEs, as well as future DH-VE and instructional design research, a compilation of instructional design practices and lessons learned, and recommendations for future research.
https://www.editlib.org/p/119543/
[full dissertation is not available online - paid versions only]

Lesage, Frederik. (2009). Conventions of telepresence: designing spaces and media objects for media art experiences, sect. 4.3.1. In Networks for art work : an analysis of artistic creative engagements with new media standards, Pgs. 115-119. Retrieved from London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE).
http://etheses.lse.ac.uk/75/1/Lesage_Networks_for_art_work.pdf

The author references two telematic art works, Hole in Space and Telematic Dreaming, to aid in describing telematic art while exploring the challenges and potentials of the medium.

Sermon, P 2010 'Telematic Practice and Research Discourses: Three Practice-based Research Project Case', in: Gardine, H & Gere, C (eds.), Art Practice in a Digital Culture, First edition, Ashgate Publishing, London, United Kingdom, pp.153-164.

Abstract: This chapter focuses on the production, documentation and preservation of the author’s telematic, practice-based research in the interactive media arts. It reflects a timely practice review with significant implications for the future of exhibiting and archiving the broad range of creative arts in this field. These fundamental research questions also have relevance across a number of practice-based research fields including performance arts and the ephemeral nature of open-system interactive artworks. The objective of this chapter is to propose research methods that will approach the question of how to document and archive appropriately this transient creative practice that is so often reliant on its immediate cultural and historic context. Since the early 1990s my artistic practice has identified and questioned the notions of embodiment and disembodiment in relation to the interacting performer in telematic and telepresent art installations. At what point is the performer embodying the virtual performer in front of them? Have they therefore become disembodied by doing so? A number of interactive telematic artworks will be looked at in detail in this chapter. These case studies range from Kit Galloway and Sherrie Rabinowitz’s seminal work ‘Hole-in-Space’ to my own telepresent experiments with ‘Telematic Dreaming’ and include the current emerging creative/critical discourse in Second Life, the networked virtual/social environment, that polarizes fundamental existential questions concerning identity, the self, the ego and the (dis)embodied avatar. The preservation and documentation of this work is extremely problematic when we consider the innate issues of (dis)embodiment in relation to presence and intimacy, as experienced and performed in telematic and virtual environments. How can it become possible to reencounter a performance of dispersed and expanded bodies, multiple and interconnected identities, spectral representations and auras: in short, hybrid bodies (selves) made of flesh and digital technologies, and the intimate connections between them.

Siemens, L. (2011). The Balance between On-line and In-person Interactions: Methods for the Development of Digital Humanities Collaboration. Digital Studies / Le Champ Numérique, 2(1). Retrieved from https://www.digitalstudies.org/ojs/index.php/digital_studies/article/view/184

The author explores the role of digital and in-person collaboration tools and the pros and cons of each particular method: face-to-face, Emails and other text-based asynchronous communication tools, and Conference calls, either by telephone or VOIP, and instant messaging/chat rooms. The author draws on research from 11 interviews with DH practitioner who are currently working on DH projects.

Beaulieu, Anne. (2010). Research Note: From co-location to co-presence: Shifts in the use of ethnography for the study of knowledge. Social Studies of Science, 40(3).

Abstract: Ethnography has been successfully deployed in science and technology studies, and more specifically in laboratory studies. By using co-presence rather than co-location as a starting point to conceptualize and articulate fieldwork, new aspects of knowledge production are foregrounded in ethnographic studies. This research note proposes and discusses co-presence as an epistemic strategy that pays close attention to non-lab based knowledge production that can embrace textuality, infrastructure and mediation, and that draws into relief the role of ethnographer as author, participant-observer and scholar. Furthermore, co-presence as an approach to doing fieldwork generates new prospects for the study of knowledge production. It enables STS to develop the ethnographic study of highly mediated, distributed or non-lab-based fields, such as the humanities, e-research and e-science.

Dubnov, Shlomo; Stuart-Thompson, B.; Bezberg, E.; Eliram, E. (2011) Expressions: Inter-professional Culture via Coactive Digital Humanities Platform. Culture and Computing (Culture Computing), 2011 Second International Conference on , vol., no., pp.171,172, 20-22. [not accessible online]

Abstract: This paper explores an integrated inter-professional collaborative model and technology for a break-through digital humanities platform called Expressions. This platform was co-created by the Center for Research in Entertainment & Learning (CREL) at Calit2, UCSD and Visual Exchange Network (VEN), which is an hybrid research and production corporation for upstream 'coactive' multi-venue media.

Gardiner, Hazel; Gere, Charlie (Eds.). (2010). Art Practice in a Digital Culture. Surrey, England: Ashgate Publishing Limited.

Gere, C. (2006). A history of network art. In Corby, T. (Ed.), Network art : practices and positions. (pp. 11-23). London: Routledge.

Kac, Eduardo. (2005). Telepresence and Bio Art -- Networking Humans, Rabbits and Robots. University of Michigan Press.

Lesage, F. (2011). Telepresence and its transparent infrastructures.. Digital Creativity, 22, 103-114.

Abstract:This article critically examines Jay David Bolter and Richard Grusin's concept of remediation, specifically as it pertains to their conceptualisation of transparency, through a detailed analysis of a series of telematic artworks. Their problematic definition of remediation leads to an understanding of telepresence as a medium that denies transparency and aggressively insists for the social and physical reality of media, yet such a definition does not provide the analytical tools required to determine how these conditions are produced in the first place. Remediation, it will be argued, falls short for studying the relations of power that enable and constrain representation, particularly in the case of media such as telepresence. A solution is found in Leah Lievrouw's ‘reconfiguration’ as a complement to remediation. Based on findings from a recent case study, the article will show how this dual approach can be employed to study how artists appropriate information infrastructure.
Note: not accessible online

Ulmer, Gregory. (2011). Avatar Emergency. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 5(3). http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/5/3/000100/000100.html?aprilfool=false

Abstract: The original usage of avatar referred to the incarnation or human appearance of a deity, particularly Vishnu, in Hindu mythology. The term was adapted to cyberspace to name one’s online persona. This usage has come to include every aspect of one’s online representation, from the icon on a blog, or an email signature to the figure one plays in Second Life. Avatar, then, is a practical point of entry for theorizing the emergence of the new identity experience of electracy, that is supplementing and displacing selfhood, the identity formation of literacy. Playing one’s avatar is to electracy what writing an essay is to literacy. The point addressed in this essay is that an avatar is not merely the appearance of one’s representation, since through interactivity and even telepresence, I am t/here with my image. What is it to be/have an image? The answer begins with noting the literal meaning of the avatar in Sanskrit: "Descent." Vishnu has descended (taken on embodiment) nine times, to correct a disordered world condition. This essay initiates a review of the cultural archive to see what is known already about our question (representations of "descent"). It is perhaps obvious, considering the prominence of Christianity in our heritage, that the West accumulated a huge amount of information about becoming body. Two examples are referenced in this introductory piece: Krishna and Orpheus.

Wankel, Charles (Ed) (2013). Digital Humanities: Current Perspective, Practices, and Research. Emerald Group Publishing [not accessible online]

Craenen, B., Murgatroyd, P., Theodoropoulos, G., Gaffney, V., & Suryanarayanan, V. (2012). MWGrid: A system for distributed agent-based simulation in the digital humanities. 2012 IEEE/ACM 16th International Symposium on Distributed Simulation and Real Time Applications, , 124-131. doi:10.1109/DS-RT.2012.24

Digital Humanities offer a new exciting domain for agent-based distributed simulation. In historical studies interpretation rarely rises above the level of unproven assertion and is rarely tested against a range of evidence. Agent-based simulation can provide an opportunity to break these cycles of academic claim and counterclaim. The MWGrid framework utilises distributed agent based simulation to study medieval military logistics. As a use-case, it has focused on the logistical analysis of the Byzantine army's march to the battle of Manzikert (AD 1071), a key event in medieval history. It integrates an agent design template, a transparent, layered mechanism to translate model-level agents' actions to time stamped events and the PDES-MAS distributed simulation kernel. The paper presents an overview of the MWGrid system and a quantitative evaluation of its performance.

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