Live Coding and the Digital Humanities (annotated bibliography)


Principal Questions (become sections of document):
  • What are the key documents and major controversies/developments in the digital humanities?
  • What have the digital humanities said about the promise of humanities researchers and students working with code?
  • What have the digital humanities said about pedagogical challenges in connection with code in an Arts and Humanities context?
  • What has the digital humanities said about the role of electronic arts (new media art) in relation to DH?
  • What has the digital humanities said about the design of programming languages?
  • (Have the digital humanities said anything about domain specific languages (DSLs))?
  • What has DH research said about the possibilities and challenges of telepresence/live interaction over networks?

Agenda Questions (not sections of bibliography, here simply as context)
  • Could and should a research centre with a live code + network music focus position itself as working in the digital humanities?
  • What are practices for the new research centre that will facilitate collaboration with live coding + network music but across the humanities?
  • What might live coding activities bring to other forms of humanities research?
  • What might network music activities bring to other forms of humanities research?

David is beginning to write narrative for research centre here...
(and removing or condensing stuff from sections below once it is incorporated)

In Stephen Ramsay's view, the activity of building, which may or may not take the form of programming, is the essential feature defining the work of the Digital Humanities (2011a, 2011b).
Ramsay, Stephen. (2011a). Who’s In and Who’s Out. Position paper at the “History and Future of Digital Humanities” panel at the 2011 MLA.
Ramsay, Stephan. (2011b). On Building.


Digital Humanities: Key documents and major controversies/developments

Key Reading:

The Digital Humanities Manifesto 2.0
http://www.humanitiesblast.com/manifesto/Manifesto_V2.pdf

Berry, D. M. (2011). THE COMPUTATIONAL TURN: THINKING ABOUT THE DIGITAL HUMANITIES. Culture Machine.

The author describes the increasing importance of incorporating the understanding of code and computation into the academic reflection of the impact the digital has on the humanities. “That is, computational technology has become the very condition of possibility required in order to think about many of the questions raised in the humanities today.“ “I propose to look at the digital component of the digital humanities in the light of its medium specificity, as a way of thinking about how medial changes produce epistemic changes.”” Broadly speaking, then, this paper suggests that we take a philosophical approach to the subject of computer code, paying attention to the wider aspects of code and software, and connecting them to the materiality of this growing digital world. With this in mind, the question of code becomes central to understanding in the digital humanities, and serves as a condition of possibility for the many computational forms that mediate out experience of contemporary culture and society.”

Borgman, C. L. (2009). The digital future is now: A call to action for the humanities. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 3(4).
http://digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/3/4/000077/000077.html /000077.html Digital Humanities Quarterly is published under a Creative Commons 3.0 license.
Keywords: cyberinfrastructure, eScience, publication practices, data, research methods, collaboration, learning

Drawing from common place practices in the Sciences (cyberinfrastructure and eScience) the author compares 6 factors; publication practices, data, research methods, collaboration, incentives, and learning. From these comparisons five questions are presented as to be addressed by the DH community:
What are data? What are the infrastructure requirements? Where are the social studies of digital humanities? What is the humanities laboratory of the 21st century? What is the value proposition for digital humanities in an era of declining budgets?

Kirschenbaum, Matthew. (2012). What Is Digital Humanities and What’s It Doing in English Departments? Debates in the Digital Humanities, online edition.
http://dhdebates.gc.cuny.edu/debates/text/38

The author begins by pointing out the growing breadth of attempts to define DH leading to the statement, "digital humanities is more akin to a common methodological outlook than an investment in any one specific set of texts or even technologies". The author provides a concise history of where the term DH came from and continues by providing 6 reasons for it flourishing in English departments. Describing DH as a "free floating signifier" the author points to open access, peer review, tenure, and promotion as areas of contention in relation to academic institutions. The author concludes that "the digital humanities today is about a scholarship (and a pedagogy) that is publicly visible in ways to which we are generally unaccustomed, ... bound up with infrastructure in ways that are deeper and more explicit than we are generally accustomed to, ... are collaborative and depend on networks of people and that live an active, 24-7 life online."

Liu, A. (2013). The Meaning of the Digital Humanities. PMLA, 128(2), 409–423.

The author circumscribes the DH as it connects with other disciplines such as Media studies and Communications noting researchers who exist in both camps yet makes the argument that the DH needs to be connected to the core mission of the Humanities. “My thesis is that an understanding of the digital humanities can only rise to the level of an explanation if we see that the underlying issue is the disciplinary identity not of the digital humanities but of the humanities themselves.” The DH project A Quantitative Literary History of 2,958 Nineteenth-Century British Novels: The Semantic Cohort Method , by Heuser and Le- Khac’s, is used to traverse pertinent issues of the DH and H: “How do we get from numbers to meaning.”; digitization, digital, and born digital objects; machine-readable vs human-readable; the progress differences of disciplines within DH related to quantitative meaning; builders vs. interpreters or the need to be builders and interpreters . Heuser and Le-Khac’s work is described acknowledging their advancement of “the initiation of interpretation through the hypothesis-free discovery of phenomena” that leads into a discussion about design as a scholarly method and seeing design in data; ‘when “used to pose and frame questions about knowledge,” design is “an intellectual method,” an “embodiment of a project’s argument and methodology,” “an act of thinking,” and a “new foundation for the conceptualization and production of knowledge”’.

McPherson, T. (2009). Introduction: Media Studies and the Digital Humanities. Cinema Journal, 48(2), 119–123.

The author discusses the emergent of a new type of scholar “the multimodal scholar” as one that “brings together databases, scholarly tools, networked writing, and peer-to-peer commentary while also leveraging the potential of visual and aural media that so dominate contemporary life” arguing that “that hands-on engagement with digital forms reorients the scholarly imagination, not because the tools are cool or new (even if they are) or because the audience for our work might be expanded (even if it is), but because scholars come to realize that they understand their arguments and their objects of study differently, even better, when they approach them through multiple modalities and emergent and interconnected forms of literacy”. The author notes that “(a) deep engagement with databases and algorithms allows humanities scholars to formulate new research questions” and that emerging and existing technology allow for different scholarly outputs and concludes that it is “imperative that we be involved in the design and construction of the emerging networked platforms and practices that will shape the contours not only of our research, but of social meaning and being for decades to come.”

Prescott, Andrew. (2012) An Electric Current of the Imagination: What the Digital Humanities Are and What They Might Become. The Journal of the Digital Humanities, 1(2). http://journalofdigitalhumanities.org/1-2/an-electric-current-of-the-imagination-by-andrew-prescott/

The author describes of collection of works within the DH leading to the assertion that it is essential to engage with the digital world not as consumers but as creators. The topics, commercial resources vs DH based (universities), record of the DH, and the potential of DH are covered. With a focus on text and digital technology the author highlights some issues of DH such as the problematic yet important issue of how the DH is to “represent flux and fluidity, how to explore instability and uncertainty, and how to represent the complexity of the minute”, the need and dependence on commercial software, the lack of DH journals being cited by other scholars and being contributed to by scholars in leading universities, the division of scholar and curator, and the lack of dialogue with scientific colleagues. The author notes in conclusion the importance of digital art in the future of DH as it breaks down disciplinary barriers and reflects on how previous points have shown that “science is used to explore the materiality of our engagement with the past and the nature of our achievements as human beings, thereby producing new art.”
Keywords: What is DH?, issues in DH

Rosenbloom, Paul S. (2012). Towards a Conceptual Framework for the Digital Humanities. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 6(2). http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/6/2/000127/000127.html

The author explores the relationship and overlap of the H and Computing as represented in DH (D=computing H=H) by including the humanities within the general "great scientific domain" that broadens the narrow definition of science (as scientific method) to include the physical, life, social, and computing sciences. (H being a subsection of the social sciences). "As I have been reflecting on computing, and following the resulting implications where they lead, I have come to accept the notion that any enterprise that tends to increase our understanding of the world over time should be considered as essentially scientific, and thus part of science....The notion that the term "science" is appropriate for all human intellectual endeavors that meet the criterion of tending to increase our understanding over time can, to some extent, be viewed as a return to the original notion of philosophy, or love of wisdom, from which modern science descended through the splintering off of natural philosophy" After a discussion of strong and weak methods and their relation to particular inquiries the author uses the Metascience Expression (ME) language. The author concludes with a comparison of his overview to the 5 engagements with technology (Svensson, 2010) and noting that there are two areas not represented, objects about the digital and computational creativity (automated composition etc.).

Svensson, Patrik. (2010). The Landscape of Digital Humanities. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 4(1). http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/4/1/000080/000080.html
keywords: What is DH?, cyberinfrastructure,

The author approaches the DH in three distinct sections of the article; first surveying the landscape of DH in a broad sense, second focusing on four encounters with DH centers, and thirdly by exploring specific modes of engagement relevant to DH. The first section explores the definitions of DH acknowledging current tensions to define/redefine an area that is emerging, or at least thought to be. Definitions from the DH manifesto 2.0 and DHQ are compared leading to two types of DH – focus on the technology as a tool versus an object of study. The general landscape of DH is then explored from the Perspectives from Library and Information Science, Cyberculture studies and critical digital studies, and Digital humanities as Activism and Artistic practice to compare the current contexts that DH is growing out of. The second section focuses on the philosophy and practice of four current centers of DH, ACTLab at the University of Texas, Stanford Humanities Lab (SHL), the Humanities computing Program at Alberta University, and HUMlab at Umea University. The final section explores the modes of engagement of tool, study object, expressive medium, exploratory Laboratory, and activist Venue. In conclusion the author notes the current state of negotiation occurring within and around the DH and raises questions regarding cyberinfrastructure and relationships with science and engineering driven agendas.

Further Resources:

The Digital Humanities Manifesto
http://manifesto.humanities.ucla.edu/2008/12/15/digital-humanities-manifesto/

Day of DH: Defining the Digital Humanities. Debates in Digital Humanities
http://dhdebates.gc.cuny.edu/debates/text/40

A collection of personal definitions collected from those working in the field of Digital Humanities.

Alvarado, Rafael C. (2012) The Digital Humanities Situation. Debates in Digital Humanities, online edition.
http://dhdebates.gc.cuny.edu/debates/text/50

The author provides an overview of the trouble of defining the DH stating "there is simply no way to describe the digital humanities as anything like a discipline" pointing out the breadth of knowledge one would need to cover all aspects that fall under DH. "(R)eal digital humanists are engaged in the play of representation, which profoundly involves putting things together, whether the vehicle of assembly be Lisp or Zotero."

Borgman, C. L. (2009). Scholarship in the Digital Age: Blurring the Boundaries between the Sciences and the Humanities (Keynote Talk)" Digital Humanities Conference. College Park, MD. Jun. 2009. Available at: http://works.bepress.com/borgman/216

Brunner, T. F. (1993). Classics and the Computer: The History of a Relationship. In J. Solomon (ed.), Accessing Antiquity: The Computerization of Classical Studies (pp. 10–33). Tucson: University of Arizona Press.

Burnard, L. (1988). Report of Workshop on Text Encoding Guidelines. Literary and Linguistic Computing 3: 131–3.

Clement, T. E. (2012). Half-Baked: The State of Evaluation in the Digital Humanities. American Literary History, 24(4), 876–890.

The author contextualizes the discussion of evaluation in the digital humanities with the review of two books, The American Literature Scholar in the Digital Age and Switching Codes noting that the humanities scholars are ill equipped to recognize the scholarship of projects discussed in the books. The issues of increased access, infrastructure, and collaborative work are pointed out as crucial issues to DH along with collaboration, scholarly communications, aggregation, encoding, scholarly editing and interface design, textual analysis and visualization are typifying scholarship in the digital age. A comparison between digital tool use and digital tool creation noting that the later is not deemed scholarly yet the contrary is argued by Rockwell that tools are informed by theories about research, “an implementation of a potential method of research” that “bears a theory about the practice of interpretation and the potential for computer-assisted interpretation” and these theories must be engaged and therefore evaluated through practice, “because they instantiate the methods and hermeneutical processes”.

Deegan, M. (2014). “This ever more amorphous thing called Digital Humanities”: Whither the Humanities Project? Arts and Humanities in Higher Education, 13(1-2), 24–41. doi:10.1177/1474022213513180

The author discusses the tensions between scientific and humanistic knowledge grounded in Snow’s criticism of “two cultures”. The “crises “ in the humanities is discussed in terms of the high praise it receives in its pursuits of human understanding yet decreasing enrollment in universities. The impact of the DH and the need to define the DH is questioned leading into a discussion the current state of the DH.

Gibbs, Fred. (2012). Critical Discourse in Digital Humanities. The Journal of Digital Humanities 1(1).
http://journalofdigitalhumanities.org/1-1/critical-discourse-in-digital-humanities-by-fred-gibbs/

The author explores the value of creating a critical discourse around scholarly work in the DH focusing on 3 main points: Digital humanists have not created an effective critical discourse around their work, the need for more theoretical and practical rubrics for evaluating digital humanities work, and Digital humanities work requires a different kind of peer review to produce effective criticism.
Keywords: critical discourse, DH, Transparency, Reusability, data, design, peer-review

Gold, Matthew K. (2012). The Digital Humanities Moment. Debates in the Digital Humanities, online edition.
http://dhdebates.gc.cuny.edu/debates/text/2

Hockey, Susan. (2004). The History of Humanities Computing. In Schreibman, Siemens, and Unsworth, Companion to Digital Humanities (Blackwell Companions to Literature and Culture).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/companion/view?docId=blackwell/9781405103213/9781405103213.xml&chunk.id=ss1-2-1&toc.depth=1&toc.id=ss1-2-1&brand=9781405103213_brand

The author presents a chronological account of the developments in humanities computing highlighting events for which significant intellectual progress has been made or where work in humanities computing has influenced other disciplines. The article consists of four main sections, Beginnings: 1949 - 1970s, Consolidation: 1970-1980s, New Developments: 1980-1990s, and The Era of the Internet: Early 1990 - present.

Liu, A. (2012). The state of the digital humanities: A report and a critique. Arts and Humanities in Higher Education, 11(1-2), 8-41. doi:10.1177/1474022211427364

The scholarly field of the digital humanities has recently expanded and integrated its fundamental concepts, historical coverage, relationship to social experience, scale of projects, and range of interpretive approaches. All this brings the overall field (including the related area of new media studies) to a tipping point where it has the potential not just to facilitate the work of the humanities but to represent the state of the humanities at large in its changing relation to higher education in the postindustrial state. Are the digital humanities up to this larger task?

Spiro, Lisa. (2012) “This Is Why We Fight”: Defining the Values of the Digital Humanities. Debates in the Digital Humanities, online edition.
http://dhdebates.gc.cuny.edu/debates/text/13

The author approaches understanding the DH not as a specific definition but as a community that comes together around a set of values; Openness, Collaboration, Collegiality and Connectedness, Diversity, and Experimentation. The author includes a discussion on why the DH needs a set of values as well as description of how to produce a value statement.

Rockwell, Geoffrey; Organisciak, Peter; Meredith-Lobay, Megan; Ranaweera, Kamal; Rueker, Stan; and Nyhan, Julianne. (2012). The Design of an International Social Media Event: A Day in the Life of the Digital Humanities. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 6(2). http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/6/2/000123/000123.html

Rosenbloom, Paul S. (2012). Towards a Conceptual Framework for the Digital Humanities. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 6(2).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/6/2/000127/000127.html

The author explores the relationship and overlap of the H and Computing as represented in DH (D=computing H=H) by including the humanities within the general "great scientific domain" that broadens the narrow definition of science (as scientific method) to include the physical, life, social, and computing sciences. (H being a subsection of the social sciences). "As I have been reflecting on computing, and following the resulting implications where they lead, I have come to accept the notion that any enterprise that tends to increase our understanding of the world over time should be considered as essentially scientific, and thus part of science....The notion that the term "science" is appropriate for all human intellectual endeavors that meet the criterion of tending to increase our understanding over time can, to some extent, be viewed as a return to the original notion of philosophy, or love of wisdom, from which modern science descended through the splintering off of natural philosophy" After a discussion of strong and weak methods and their relation to particular inquiries the author uses the Metascience Expression (ME) language. The author concludes with a comparison of his overview to the 5 engagements with technology (Svensson, 2010) and noting that there are two areas not represented, objects about the digital and computational creativity (automated composition etc.).

Smithies, James. (2014). Digital Humanities, Postfoundationalism, Postindustrial Culture. Digital Humanities Quarterly 8(1).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/8/1/000172/000172.html

Sporton, Gregory. (2009). The e Prefix: e-Science, e-Art & the New Creativity. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 3(4).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/3/4/000074/000074.html
Keywords: e-culture, creativity
quote: "Sporton argues that beyond the effect of explaining this is something to do with technology, there is an emergent "e-culture" that reunites the arts and sciences after two hundred years of separate development within the academy. An "e-Culture" emerges that reflects the values, opportunities and restrictions of Internet as a research environment. The potential of that environment requires a mindset focussed on collaboration to achieve anything of creative significance."

Svensson, P. (2012). The digital humanities as a humanities project. Arts and Humanities in Higher Education, 11(1-2), 42-60. doi:10.1177/1474022211427367

This article argues that the digital humanities can be seen as a humanities project in a time of significant change in the academy. The background is a number of scholarly, educational and technical challenges, the multiple epistemic traditions linked to the digital humanities, the potential reach of the field across and outside the humanities, and the ‘digital’ as a boundary object. In the article, four case studies are used to exemplify the digital humanities as a humanities project, and it is suggested that the field can be seen as a trading zone and meeting place rather than a strained ‘big tent’. In this way, the digital humanities can accept scholarly and technological challenges in relation to the digital as well as being an important place for thinking about, experimenting with and rethinking the humanities.

Svensson, Patrik. (2012). Beyond the Big Tent. Debates in the Digital Humanities. U of Minnesota Press. pgs. 36-49.
http://dhdebates.gc.cuny.edu/debates/text/22

The author discusses the notion of a “big tent” definition of DH that is widely inclusive and instead proposes the notion of the DH being a “trading zone and meeting place”. The author describes the tension between traditional methods of DH for which technology as a tool and the “newcomers” who start out with different “modes of engagement between the humanities and the digital”. Restates “the interrelation between the humanities and the digital can be discussed in terms of different modes of engagement: the digital or technology as tool, study object, medium, laboratory, and activist venue”. Raises the questions of whether the “bt” definition of DH can include work “construing the digital as an object of inquiry rather than as a tool”, “whether there is room for research in the digital humanities that does not engage with tools, or “making” in Ramsey’s fairly narrow sense, and whether that work can be accepted in its own right”. The author proceeds to discuss the nature of “call for works” in certain journals and how DH, while proclaiming to be inclusive, discourage participation from those outside of DH, yet connected.

Svensson, Patrik. (2012). Envisioning the Digital Humanities. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 6(1).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/6/1/000112/000112.html

The author discusses the visionary aspect of DH. The first or three sections explores the background and critical framing of the visionary sentiment in the DH by discussing visible accounts and there differences in accordance to their epistemic commitments. The second section explores three texts: "the Digital Humanities Manifesto 2.0, the 2006 American Council of Learned Societies Report on "Our Common Commonwealth," the website of the Institute for Computing in Humanities, Arts, and Social Science, and Melissa Terras’s plenary lecture at the conference Digital Humanities 2010". The third discusses a "tentative visionary scope for the digital humanities" that is grounded on a series of design parameters such as "mutual respect, engagement with technology, and disciplinary grounding"

Svensson, P. (2011). From Optical Fiber To Conceptual Cyberinfrastructure. DHQ: Digital Humanities Quarterly, 5(1). Retrieved from http://digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/5/1/000090/000090.html

The author argues "the humanities need to consider the multiple opportunities associated with cyberinfrastructure, while maintaining epistemic integrity and avoiding modeling new infrastructure uncritically after existing models." The definition of infrastructure is reviewed followed by a discussion of the risks and strategies in developing a humanities infrastructure. An overview of three models are given to highlight their non-neutrality, followed by a lengthy overview of the HUMlab with in the described context.

Svensson, Patrik. (2009). Humanities Computing as Digital Humanities. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 3(3).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/3/3/000065/000065.html
Keywords: What is DH

The author discusses Humanities Computing as a unique "discipline" and explores its relationships to a broader definition of the DH. "An important aspect of this ongoing transformation of the humanities is humanities scholars’ increasing use and exploration of information technology as both a scholastic tool and a cultural object in need of analysis." A brief history of Humanities Computing is traversed noting the development of the journals Literary and Linguistic Computing and Computers and the Humanities, as well as various institutional models. The author discusses the textual focus of HC and the DH and the need to expand this to include research into multimodal scholarship. "A broadly conceived digital humanities would necessarily include the instrumental, methodological, textual and digitalized, but also new study objects, multiple modes of engagement, theoretical issues from the humanities disciplines, the non-textual and the born digital... The story of the digital humanities continues to be complex in terms of the theoretical, practice-based, historical, technical and disciplinary foundations and a fast-changing landscape. It is exactly these qualities that make digital humanities an exciting field to study, and a place full of energy and multiple identities."

Coding and Digital Humanities | James Gottlieb. (n.d.). Retrieved April 21, 2014, from http://www.jamesgottlieb.com/2012/03/coding-and-digital-humanities/

The Importance of Humanities Programming In Strengthening Communities | Alabama Humanities Foundation. (n.d.). Retrieved April 21, 2014, from http://www.alabamahumanities.org/the-importance-of-humanities-programming-in-strengthening-communities/

Recently Added:
Ehrlich, H. (1991). An Interdisciplinary Bibliography for Computers and the Humanities Courses. Computers and the Humanities, 25(5), 315–326.
(review as it lists reference for different sections)
Pelt, T. V. (2002). The Question concerning Theory: Humanism, Subjectivity, and Computing. Computers and the Humanities, 36(3), 307–318.
Raben, J. (1991). Humanities Computing 25 Years Later. Computers and the Humanities, 25(6), 341–350.
Zampolli, A. (1973). Humanities Computing in Italy. Computers and the Humanities, 7(6), 343–360.

What have the digital humanities said about the promise of humanities researchers and students working with code?


Key Reading:

Blanchette, Jean-François. (2011). “Infrastructural Thinking” as Core Computing Skill. Proceedings of Digital Humanities Conference 2011.
Abstract: http://dh2011abstracts.stanford.edu/xtf/view?docId=tei/ab-263.xml;query=programming;brand=default

The author argues that programming or “computational thinking” is only part of the picture of computing (and the skill sets for) and that for a fuller understanding an engagement with the material foundations of computing is necessary. “Computational thinking” has been introduced as a beneficial endeavor for DH and the author argues that the computing infrastructure implicitly performs this and “infrastructural thinking” should be introduced.

Bunde, J., & Engel, D. (2010). Computing in the humanities: An interdisciplinary partnership in undergraduate education. Journal of Archival Organization, 8(2), 149-159. doi:10.1080/15332748.2010.519993

Computing in the Humanities, an undergraduate course for Computer Science Department majors and minors and Web Programming minors at New York University, represents a unique collaboration between the Computer Science Department and the University Archives. The course's final assignment required students to select, digitize, and contextualize materials from the Archives’ collections in an interactive Web site. The design and implementation of the course incorporates four current and important trends in both disciplines. First, the professor and archivist worked closely together before and during the course, which served to integrate the archival research component into the core mission of the course. Second, the students’ projects provided increased subject access and dynamic Web content to the repository and meaningful work to the students. Third, this course produced students who “bridge” the needs of humanists with the capabilities of technology. Fourth, this course illustrated the growing importance of Web programming and project-based courses in undergraduate computer science education.

Conatser, Trey. (2013). Changing Medium, Transforming Composition. The Journal of Digital Humanities.
http://journalofdigitalhumanities.org/2-2/changing-medium-transforming-composition-by-trey-conatser/

The author discusses an English writing course that includes the inclusion of XML as to help teach writing for the 21st Century.
Keywords: XML, pedagogy,

Gleason, Christopher Scott. (2013). DH@WIT: Digital Humanities for Undergraduate Design, Engineering, and Management Students. Proceedings of Digital Humanities Conference 2013, 16-19 July 2013, Nebraska, Lincoln. Abstract: http://dh2013.unl.edu/abstracts/ab-215.html
Quote: "Our research suggests that DH graduates with a strong background in computer application design and programming are likely to have the best prospects for a job outside of academia."

The author describes current work in developing a "digital humanities-inflected undergraduate curriculum" at Wentworth Institute of Technology motivated by three feasibility studies.

Ramsay, S.. (2012). Programming with Humanists: Reflections on Raising an Army of Hacker-Scholars in the Digital Humanities. In Hirsch, B. D. (ed.), Teaching Digital Humanities: Principles, Practices, Politics. pgs. 241-254. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.

The author discusses his experience of teaching programming to humanities students and reflects on the successes and failures that the course has had. Avoiding the pitfall of declarations such as “program or be programmed” the author aligns programming with writing as a subject that is an object of study but also a process that is beneficial in its own right – such as students writing essays to learn how to write essays – and thus benefiting from the modes of thinking that are come along with improved writing/programming skills. The author describes strategies to provide in such a course as well as some pitfalls to avoid attempting to emulate the ways in which software projects are actually developed in the DH, reminding us that the goal of DH is to aid in “humanistic thinking” and how that includes forms of “computational thinking”.



Further Resources:


Review:
http://www.annettevee.com/blog/2012/06/07/proceduracy-annotated-bibliography/

Recently Added:
Cushing, S. (1991). “Minds and Machines” for Humanities Majors: A Liberal Arts Course in Computers and Cognition. Computers and the Humanities, 25(5), 275–280.

Koch, C. (1991). On the Benefits of Interrelating Computer Science and the Humanities: The Case of Metaphor. Computers and the Humanities, 25(5), 289–295.
The Author discusses the lack of courses that bridge computing and the humanities and suggests a course on metaphor that uses computation to explore it in the current philosophical contexts. “The course on metaphor would begin with two concurrent activities: first, an overview of various traditional theories of metaphor; second, instruction in the C programming language.” An overview of the course and its rationale is given with the attempt to bring real programming skills to humanities scholars such as to move beyond the “lightweight” use of computers.


Forte, A. (1967). Music and Computing: The Present Situation. Computers and the Humanities, 2(1), 32–35.
Hewlett, W. B., & Selfridge-Field, E. (1991). Computing in Musicology, 1966-91. Computers and the Humanities, 25(6), 381–392.

Rich, E. (1985). Artificial Intelligence and the Humanities. Computers and the Humanities, 19(2), 117–122.

The author discusses the overlap of AI and the Humanities in their quest to solve problems as well as their shared methodology.

Cramer, H., & Taylor, I. (1973). Computer Language: An Innovation in the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Computers and the Humanities, 7(6), 417–418.
Cline, H. F. (1968). Computer Instruction for Scholars in the Humanities. Computers and the Humanities, 3(1), 31–40.
Alonso, S., Appleton, J. H., & Jones, C. (1976). A Special Purpose Digital System for Musical Instruction, Composition, and Performance. Computers and the Humanities, 10(4), 209–215.
Jr., H. S. H. (1975). Composing by Computer. Computers and the Humanities, 9(6), 281–290.
Wolff, A. B. (1977). Problems of Representation in Musical Computing. Computers and the Humanities, 11(1), 3–12.
Wishy, B. (1967). New Hardware for the Humanities. Computers and the Humanities, 2(1), 1–11.


DH: Pedagogical Challenges of code in an Arts and Humanities context


Key Reading:

Ramsay, S.. (2012). Programming with Humanists: Reflections on Raising an Army of Hacker-Scholars in the Digital Humanities. In Hirsch, B. D. (ed.), Teaching Digital Humanities: Principles, Practices, Politics. pgs. 241-254. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press. [duplicate: promise of working with code]

The author discusses his experience of teaching programming to humanities students and reflects on the successes and failures that the course has had. Avoiding the pitfall of declarations such as “program or be programmed” the author aligns programming with writing as a subject that is an object of study but also a process that is beneficial in its own right – such as students writing essays to learn how to write essays – and thus benefiting from the modes of thinking that are come along with improved writing/programming skills. The author describes strategies to provide in such a course as well as some pitfalls to avoid attempting to emulate the ways in which software projects are actually developed in the DH, reminding us that the goal of DH is to aid in “humanistic thinking” and how that includes forms of “computational thinking”.

Ohya, Kazushi. (2013) Programming with Arduino for Digital Humanities. The Journal of Digital Humanities, 2(3). http://journalofdigitalhumanities.org/2-3/programming-with-arduino-for-digital-humanities/

The author reflects on the difficulties of coding courses for humanities students and suggests course designed around letting students be interested in something moving, and letting students be satisfied with small results.
Keywords: courses, code, programming, arduino


New Additions:
Hockey, S. (1986). Workshop on Teaching Computers and the Humanities Courses. Literary and Linguistic Computing 1: 228–9.

The author reviews a workshop on teaching computers and the Humanities courses providing an overview of discussions on Programming, Applications, Hardware, Order of teaching the materials, Computer Literacy, and Who should teach the courses. The general outcome relating to programming, as well as knowledge about applications and hardware was split as to what should be included; though the consensus was that it should be introduced in the context of Humanities issues.

Hidley, G. R. “Some Thoughts Concerning the Application of Software Tools in Support of Old English Poetic Studies.” Literary and Linguistic Computing 1, no. 3 (January 1, 1986): 156–62. doi:10.1093/llc/1.3.156. (programming section?)

Hockey, S. (1986). Workshop on Teaching Computers and the Humanities Courses. Literary and Linguistic Computing, 1(4), 228–229. doi:10.1093/llc/1.4.228

Further Resources:



Fyfe, Paul. (2011). Digital Pedagogy Unplugged. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 5(2).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/5/3/000106/000106.html

The author discusses the strategy of pedagogy without digital technology using examples from experience as to highlight the unfortunate situations that have occurred for which the technology has replaced teaching, instead of enhancing it.

Boggs, Jeremy; Nowviskie, Bethany; Gil, Alexander; Johnson, Eric; Lestock, Brooke; Storti, Sarah; and Swafford, Joanna. (2012). Realigning Digital Humanities Training: The Praxis Program at the Scholars’ Lab.Proceedings of Digital Humanities Conference 2012.
Abstract: http://www.dh2012.uni-hamburg.de/conference/programme/abstracts/realigning-digital-humanities-training-the-praxis-program-at-the-scholars-lab/

Recently Added:
Campo, L. de. (1972). Computer Courses for the Humanist: A Survey. Computers and the Humanities, 7(1), 57–62.

Dobberstein, M. (1993). Computer Literacy for the Rest of Us. Computers and the Humanities, 27(5/6), 429–433.

The author discusses the meaning and relevancy of computer literacy in the context of the humanities. An overview of differing opinions on the topic are covered ranging from CL in relation to professional programmers to CL as the most basic and rudimentary aspects of computer use. The author explores the topic in different contexts and offers the move from CL to CLs that will vary based on the context of its use and recommends an course that would provide the basic of computer use to new students.

Rudman, J. (1987). Teaching Computers and the Humanities Courses: A Survey. Computers and the Humanities, 21(4), 235–243.
The author provides a brief overview of a survey that was sent to numerous Universities and Colleges regarding computing in the humanities courses. The author notes that few humanists value the computer, the need for more courses, and three deficiencies that stint computing in the humanities courses: money, computing facilities, and qualified instructors. The appendices are as follows: Appendix A: the survey; Appendix B: The list of Universities and Colleges the survey was sent to and who returned the survey; Appendix C: List of respondents by department; Appendix D: List of courses; Appendix E: continues this information: name of the instructor, the text and/or other material, and any prerequisites; Appendix F lists the aims of the listed courses, Appendix G lists suggestions for those planning a course; Appendix H reports the languages and machines that educators are using, not those that they think would be the best with which to teach or do research; and Appendix I: contains a histogram that shows an estimate of the amount of mathematics involved in each of the courses

Allen, J. R. (1974). The Development of Computer Courses for Humanists. Computers and the Humanities, 8(5/6), 291–295.

The author provides the results of a survey on computing courses provided in the humanities. The list of textbooks used and an overview of University Department, Course title, Instructor, number of Credits, and prerequisites are given. The findings reveal the split on the issue of how much programming should be included, "The professors teaching these subjects were asked what the aims of their courses were. Not surprisingly, the most frequent reason given (applicable to twenty-four courses) was to instruct persons outside mathematics and the sciences how to program.The second most frequent justification for such a course was to introduce concepts or principles of computing but not to deal with programming except in the most incidental way."

Rudman, J. (1987). Selected Bibliography for Computer Courses in the Humanities. Computers and the Humanities, 21(4), 245–254.

Tannenbaum, R. S. (1987). How Should We Teach Computing to Humanists? Computers and the Humanities, 21(4), 217–225.

The author provides an overview on how to teach computing to humanists that was motivated by the author’s participation as a panel member part of a larger conference on the topic. The author provides a brief background on the other panellists noting the varied perspectives on the topic that fundamentally includes the issue to the necessity of programming - the authors point of view is that basic programming is important to understanding the larger topic of computers.

Bowles, E. A. (1971). Towards a Computer Curriculum for the Humanities. Computers and the Humanities, 6(1), 35–38.

The author provides a brief overview of courses that were offered at the time of writing the article. Two conclusions are offered: "the computer has made only slight inroads in the humanities curriculum" and the courses are dependent on their "instigators" (those who push to make the course available and teach it and when they are gone so is the course).

Rudman, J. (1978). Computer Courses for Humanists: A Survey. Computers and the Humanities, 12(3), 253–279.

Ide, N. M. (1987). Computers and the Humanities Courses: Philosophical Bases and Approach. Computers and the Humanities, 21(4), 209–215.

The author discusses the philosophical bases for computing in the humanities based on participating as a panel member for the Vassar Workshop. The discusses the agreements and disagreements from the panel discussion which revealed a clear dichotomy in the philosophy regarding the topic which regards the type of courses that should be available to students. The key disagreement was to what degree computers should be taught which is described in the extreme positions of "Holistic" and "Expert" views. The author describes the assumptions that the panel discussion rested upon before exploring these two positions.

Holland, S., & Burgess, G. (1992). Beauty and the Beast: New Approaches to Teaching Computing for Humanities Students at the University of Aberdeen. Computers and the Humanities, 26(4), 267–274.

The author reviews previously offered courses and current ones at Aberdeen University revealing the pros and cons and how these were addressed and implemented into the current course. The author notes an increase in learning moving from a MS-DOS based system to an GUI Mac system as the programs were easier to learn, the GUI aspect transferred to other programs, the reversibility (undo) aspect of the GUI environment, and the increased depth of learning as more complex ideas were accessible as the students were not bogged down with memorizing abstract text commands. The author also notes the benefits of introducing AI and Human Computer Interface design into the course as to expose the students to areas of computer science where Arts students are able to contribute without being computer science majors (influenced by courses at IRCAM that taught LISP to music students) as well as the benefits of using computers to aid in teaching.

Hockey, S. (1992). Some Perspectives on Teaching Computers and the Humanities. Computers and the Humanities, 26(4), 261–266.
The author discusses the issue of computing in the humanities and notes the difficulty in distinguishing between research and teaching the subject.

Irizarry, E. (1992). Courseware in the Humanities: Expanded Horizons. Computers and the Humanities, 26(4), 275–284.
Winkelmann, C. L. (1995). Electronic Literacy, Critical Pedagogy, and Collaboration: A Case for Cyborg Writing. Computers and the Humanities, 29(6), 431–448.
New Courses Established. (1969). Computers and the Humanities, 3(3), 162.
New Courses Listed. (1970). Computers and the Humanities, 4(5), 318.
New Courses Listed. (1970). Computers and the Humanities, 4(4), 240.

DH: Role of electronic arts (new media art) in relation to DH

- discussion of design and HCI
- practice and artistic related scholarly research
-- PhD in "digital" artistic and PbR as a method for transcending the literary/digital divide
- multimodal scholar
- builders vs. interpreters


Key Reading:

Dussault, J.V.; Gold, N.E. (2013) Live Coding Music: Self-Expression through Innovation. Proceedings of Digital Humanities Conference 2013, 16-19 July 2013, Nebraska, Lincoln. Abstract: http://dh2013.unl.edu/abstracts/ab-315.html

The author describes live coding and explores the variations in practice of active live coders, some of whom create their own live coding environments, create shells for exiting languages, and/or use existing programming languages. The author frames his study with two questions "why are live coders creating their own systems and what types of changes are they making to the musical and programming functionality of their environments? These questions are addressed with a comparative study of a wide range of live coding environments, the literature on live coding, and by interviews with active live coders, which "categorizes methods used by live coders in a prototypical music theory."

Franchi, Stefano. (2012). May Humanists Learn from Artists a New Way to Interact with Digital Technology? Proceedings of Digital Humanities Conference 2012.
Abstract:http://www.dh2012.uni-hamburg.de/conference/programme/abstracts/may-humanists-learn-from-artists-a-new-way-to-interact-with-digital-technology/

The author compares AI and contemporary DH as interactions between computer science and traditional humanist pursuits outlining how each took over some relevant aspect of the other, AI mainly questions, DH mainly tools and notes that “(i)n most cases, however, this appropriation does not become an opportunity for a critical reflection on the role of the canon on liberal education, or for a reappraisal of the role of the text and the social, political, and moral roles it plays in society at large.” The author introduces digital art practice as a potential different paradigm as the appropriation of digital tech changes the concepts the artist works with and changes the computer scientists as well. The author uses micro-sound in compostion and the T-garden approach to agency as illustrations. “These two examples points to a pattern of cooperation between work in computational and non-computational disciplines that is deeply at odds with the AI/CogSci and DigHum patterns discussed above. Instead of a takeover, the artistic model produces a true encounter that changes both partners’ technical and theoretical apparatus.”
The author suggests that artistic practices can be seen as poesis from Aristotle’s classification of human activity as poesis, praxis, and theoria, and that it could be an inspiration for DH in forming its own “theoretical poesis” rather than “fall into the well-worn path of hostile takeovers by either partner”

Gere, Charlie. (2010). Research as Art. In: Hazel Gardiner and Charlie Gere, eds. Art Practice in a Digital Culture. England and USA: Ashgate, pp. 1-8. ISBN 978-0-754-67623-2 [Book Section].
http://www.ashgate.com/pdf/SamplePages/Art_Practice_in_a_Digital_Culture_Ch1.pdf

The author reflects on the familiar quote by C.P. Snow regarding the divide between the humanities and the sciences in relation to recent quotes that neglect work within the last 50 years that render the infamous quote obsolete. The author questions the roles of art and science in terms of experimentation claiming that maybe art (media art that shares the tech with science) is more important to experimentation than science as it is truly free to experiment.

Jefferies, Janis K. (2010). The Artist as Researcher in a Computer Mediated Culture. In: Hazel Gardiner and Charlie Gere, eds. Art Practice in a Digital Culture. England and USA: Ashgate, pp. 27-42. ISBN 978-0-754-67623-2 [Book Section]
http://cutonthebiasworkshop.files.wordpress.com/2011/05/jj-gere-final-1st-june.pdf

The author discusses artistic practice and its relation to research for those who are engaged with academia with particular focus on practice and performance based research.

Further Resources:

Deuze, Mark; Blank, Peter; and Speers, Laura. (2012). A Life Lived in Media. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 6(1).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/6/1/000110/000110.html

Sayers, Jentery. (2012). Writing with Sound: Composing Multimodal, Long-Form Scholarship.Proceedings of Digital Humanities Conference 2012.
Abstract: http://www.dh2012.uni-hamburg.de/conference/programme/abstracts/writing-with-sound-composing-multimodal-long-form-scholarship/

Gardiner, Hazel; Gere, Charlie (Eds.). (2010). Art Practice in a Digital Culture. Surrey, England: Ashgate Publishing Limited.

Anderson, Steve F. (2007). Aporias of the Digital Avant-Garde. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 1(2).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/1/2/000011/000011.html
Keywords: time-based, digital media, avant-garde, Structural film, open source programming, peer-to-peer networks,

Abstract: "This article maps two divergent trajectories within a narrowly defined sphere of short-form, time-based digital media created between 1995 and 2005. These works are considered in relation to the historical avant-garde - particularly the Structural film movement of the 1960s and 70s - and analyzed as responses to a range of cultural concerns specific to the digital age. The analysis identifies movement toward two terminal points: first, a mode of remix-based montage inspired by open source programming communities and peer-to- peer networks; and second, the emergence of a mode of imaging termed the "digital analogue", which foregrounds the material basis of digital production."

Burgess, Helen J.; Hamming, Jeanne. (2011). New Media in the Academy: Labor and the Production of Knowledge in Scholarly Multimedia. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 5(2).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/5/3/000102/000102.html

The author discusses the challenges that new media scholarship is creating for the currant standard of scholarship that results from two key obstacles: “traditionalist definitions of humanities scholarship that still overwhelmingly determine the evaluation of digital works, and a narrow understanding of what the "materiality" of new media can actually come to mean.”


Sauter, D. (2009). The Emergence Project: 
A Machine of Expression. Journal Of The Chicago Colloquium On Digital Humanities And Computer Science, 1(1). Retrieved from https://letterpress.uchicago.edu/index.php/jdhcs/article/view/11

Youngman, P. (2012). 21st-century humanities: Art, complexity, and interdisciplinarity. Human Affairs, 22(2), 111-121. doi:10.2478/s13374-012-0011-6

This article contends that the evolution toward interdisciplinary collaboration that we are witnessing in the sciences must also occur in the humanities to ensure their very survival. That is, humanists must be open to working with scientists and social scientists interested in similar research questions and vice versa. Digital humanities is a positive first step. Complexity science should be the next step. Even though much of the ground-breaking work in complexity science has been done in the natural sciences and mathematics, it can, if critically adapted, provide the needed metaphor for a broad integration of disciplines, humanistic and otherwise. Given its almost a-disciplinary nature, a complexity approach to the research problems in the humanities necessarily breaks down silos. Moreover, it can restore and reframe the seamless intellectual fabric sought by researchers before the atomization of the various disciplines in the nineteenthcentury academy.


DH: Programming Language Design

DSLs?
Eve, Eric. (2007) All Hope Abandon: Biblical Text and Interactive Fiction. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 1(2).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/1/2/000010/000010.html
Keywords: text-based interactive fiction, games (mentions domain-specific languages)

Key Reading:

Reside, Doug; Fraistat, Neil; Vershbow, Ben; and van Zundert, Joris Job. (2012). Code sprints and Infrastructure. Proceedings of Digital Humanities Conference 2012. Abstract:http://www.dh2012.uni-hamburg.de/conference/programme/abstracts/code-sprints-and-infrastructure/

The author discusses "code sprints", a week long "boot camp" where researches come together to create/program tools that will be of use to all present. The author discusses four instances of "code sprints" and recounts the lessons learned and how big infrastructure projects and rapid development projects (code sprints) can support each other.

Sinclair, Stefan; and Rockwell, Geoffrey. (2013). Voyant Notebooks: Literate Programming and Programming Literacy. The Journal of Digital Humanities, 2(3).
http://journalofdigitalhumanities.org/2-3/voyant-notebooks-literate-programming-and-programming-literacy/

The authors discuss the notion of a literate programmer as essayist and coder, and being an appropriate definition for the DH.
The poster introduces Voyant Notebooks, a web-based literate programming environment designed for the digital humanities
Keywords: pedagogy, programming, literate programming

Program language design:

Andersen, P. B. (1981). Fangorn: A Special-Purpose Language for the Humanities. Computers and the Humanities, 15(4), 227–242.

The author describes the development of a programming language for the Humanities. Due to descriptive problems that resulted from the programming language being used the author decided to create a program that did not require a subject/object dichotomy within the language. Background is provided, followed by an overview of the programs features, a description of the nodes and their uses, the implementation of the language, and an evaluation.

Shieber, S. M. (1984). The Design of a Computer Language for Linguistic Information. In Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computational Linguistics (pp. 362–366). Stroudsburg, PA, USA: Association for Computational Linguistics. doi:10.3115/980431.980566

Abstract:
A considerable body of accumulated knowledge about the design of languages for communicating information to computers has been derived from the subfields of programming language design and semantics. It has been the goal of the PArR group at SRI to utilize a relevant portion of this knowledge in implementing tools to facilitate communication of linguistic information to computers. The PATR-II formalism is our current computer language for encoding linguistic information. This paper, a brief overview of that formalism, attempts to explicate our design decisions in terms of a set of properties that effective computer languages should incorporate.

Raskin, J. (1974). FLOW: A Teaching Language for Computer Programming in the Humanities. Computers and the Humanities, 8(4), 231–237.

The author discusses the teaching programming language FLOW (created by the author) that is to be used in initial courses in programming. "The language is very limited in scope, and the pedagogical emphasis is on algorithmic design rather than extensive language features. It is used only for the very first lectures in programming in college and secondary level courses, where it allows immediate hands-on use of the computer". The main purpose of the program is to introduce the proponents of programming (3 main, 1 minor): defining the problem and specifying an algorithm (or method) that can be used to solve it on the computer; documenting that problem definition and solution; debugging the resultant program; and coding the method and the documentation into some particular programming language. The latter minor proponent usually is the bulk of courses on programming.


Barnett, M. P. (1970). SNAP: A Programming Language for Humanists. Computers and the Humanities, 4(4), 225–240.
Abstract:
SNAP is a programming language for humanists. It is the basis of a recent college text Computer Programming in English by the author of this article (1), and it is used in a course on information processing that he teaches at Columbia University to graduate students with degrees in the humanities. A SNAP processor now runs on computers made by several manufacturers. A SNAP procedure consists of simple English sentences whose general style is described in Section 1. Some of the provisions for handling strings of characters are reviewed in a little more detail in Section 2. The primary use of SNAP is to process text material mechanically, and several kinds of text processing application that occur in librarianship, publishing, teaching, marketing, and humanistic research are categorized in Section 3. The immediate "practical" objectives of the course that the author gives at Columbia are discussed in Section 4. Some further reasons for teaching programming principles to humanists are discussed in Section 5. These include the role of the underlying concepts in the education of potential decision makers, in contemporary culture, in developing modes of thought that may evolve new ideas which do not necessarily involve the computer per se, and in catalyzing the formation of new interrelationships between humanistic and scientific research.

Brown, P. J. (1972). SCAN: A Simple Conversational Programming Language for Text Analysis. Computers and the Humanities, 6(4), 223–227.

The author describes the program SCAN that is intended to be used for an small scale textual analysis, such as with introductory courses. The program was designed in reference to the programs JOSS and BASIC, both of which were meant for numerical computation, as they had the following 5 attributes which SCAN incorporated.
(1) there were built-in facilities for making corrections during a run;
(2) whenever possible, errors were pointed out immediately they were made;
(3) programs were easy to type;
(4) compilers for the languages were small, and could be shared by any number of simultaneous users, thus minimizingt he demandso n the storage space available on the computer;
(5) compilers were incremental. This means a program can be changed statement by statement without the time-consumingp rocess of recompiling the whole program each time.

Heller, J., & Logemann, G. W. (1966). PL/I: A Programming Language for Humanities Research. Computers and the Humanities, 1(2), 19–27.
The author describes the Program PL/I which is "an attempt at a unified synthesis of many current programming languages." The program was made to handle the string manipulation needs of the humanities. A basic outline of the main features of the programming language are provided including Substring, Index, Length,IF condition THEN operation, ELSE, and LOOP. " The user is required to build up a variety of subprocedures that he will use frequently in his own work. Thus he is creating his own problem-oriented language."

computational linguistics:

Zajac, R. (1986). SCSL: A Linguistic Specification Language for MT. In Proceedings of the 11th Coference on Computational Linguistics (pp. 393–398). Stroudsburg, PA, USA: Association for Computational Linguistics. doi:10.3115/991365.991481

Mooney, R. J. (1997). Inductive logic programming for natural language processing. In S. Muggleton (Ed.), Inductive Logic Programming (pp. 1–22). Springer Berlin Heidelberg. Retrieved from http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/3-540-63494-0_45

Kay, M. (1967). Standards for Encoding Data in a Natural Language. Computers and the Humanities, 1(5), 170–177.

Markup Language:

Cover, R., Duncan, N., & Barnard, D. T. (1991). The Progress of SGML (Standard Generalized Markup Language): Extracts from a Comprehensive Bibliography. Literary and Linguistic Computing, 6(3), 197–209. doi:10.1093/llc/6.3.197

Program language use/description:
Campo, L. de. (1972). Computer Courses for the Humanist: A Survey. Computers and the Humanities, 7(1), 57–62.
Computer Programs Designed to Solve Humanistic Problems. (1966). Computers and the Humanities, 1(2), 39–55.
Forte, A. (1967). The Programming Language SNOBOL3: An Introduction. Computers and the Humanities, 1(5), 157–163.
Johnson, E. (1996). Professor-Created Computer Programs for Student Research. Computers and the Humanities, 30(2), 171–179.
Humphreys, R. L. (1992). Technical Note: Perl for. Literary and Linguistic Computing, 7(3), 194–198. doi:10.1093/llc/7.3.194
Craven, P., & Traves, W. (1993). A General-Purpose Hierarchical Coding Engine and its Application to Comparative Analysis of Statutes. Literary and Linguistic Computing, 8(1), 27–32. doi:10.1093/llc/8.1.27
*Humanities Programs Available. (1973). Computers and the Humanities, 7(3), 182–186.
Dilligan, R. J. (1973). Introductory FORTRAN Textbooks: An Overview for Humanists. Computers and the Humanities, 7(6), 399–406.
Hockey, S. M. (1985). Snobol programming for the humanities. Clarendon Press.
by. (1986). Pascal for the Humanities. Barnes & Noble. Retrieved April 21, 2014, from http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/pascal-for-the-humanities-jonathan-sumption/1001329566
Küster, Marc Wilhelm. (2013). Agents for Actors: A Digital Humanities framework for distributed microservices for text linking and visualization. Proceedings of Digital Humanities Conference 2013, 16-19 July 2013, Nebraska, Lincoln. Abstract: http://dh2013.unl.edu/abstracts/ab-174.html
Mason, O. (2001). Programming for Corpus Linguistics. Edinburgh University Press.
Olsen, M. (1987). Beyond SNOBOL: The Icon Programming Language. Computers and the Humanities, 21(1), 61–66.
Python Programming for the Humanities by fbkarsdorp. (n.d.). Retrieved April 21, 2014, from http://fbkarsdorp.github.io/python-course/
Raskin, J. F. (1971). Programming Languages for the Humanities. Computers and the Humanities, 5(3), 155–158.
Solomon, Dana Ryan; Thomas, Lindsay. (2013). VizOR: Visualizing Only Revolutions, Visualizing Textual Analysis.Proceedings of Digital Humanities Conference 2013, 16-19 July 2013, Nebraska, Lincoln. Abstract: http://dh2013.unl.edu/abstracts/ab-255.html
Rudman, J. (1987). Selected Bibliography for Computer Courses in the Humanities. Computers and the Humanities, 21(4), 245–254.
Sammet, J. E. (1972). Programming Languages: History and Future. Commun. ACM, 15(7), 601–610. doi:10.1145/361454.361485

Software design:

Boot, M. (1986). BOBRA: An Expert System for Automated Language Description as a Basis for Statistical Studies. Literary and Linguistic Computing 1(2)
Gilhooly, K. J., & Green, C. (1989). A Suite of Computer Programs for use in Verbal Protocol Analysis. Literary and Linguistic Computing, 4(1), 1–5. doi:10.1093/llc/4.1.1
Johnson, E. (1996). Professor-Created Computer Programs for Student Research. Computers and the Humanities, 30(2), 171–179.
Walsh, John;Simpson, Grant Leyton. (2013). TEI Boilerplate.Proceedings of Digital Humanities Conference 2013, 16-19 July 2013, Nebraska, Lincoln.
Abstract:http://dh2013.unl.edu/abstracts/ab-355.html
Topic(s): encoding — theory and practice, publishing and delivery systems, scholarly editing, software design and development, xml, bibliographic methods/textual studies, standards and interoperability
Keyword(s): TEI, CSS, HTML5, Javascript, design

Software use:

Hidley, G.R. (1986). Some Thoughts Concerning the Application of Software Tools in Support of Old English Poetic Studies. Literary Linguistic Computing, 1(3)
Burnard, L. D. (1988). Report of Workshop on Text Encoding Guidelines. Literary and Linguistic Computing, 3(2), 131–133. doi:10.1093/llc/3.2.131
Abercrombie, J. R. (1984). Computer Programs for Literary Analysis. Philadelphia: Univ of Pennsylvania Pr.
Burton, M. L. (1973). Recent Computer Applications in Cultural Anthropology. Computers and the Humanities, 7(6), 337–341.


Miscellaneous:

Dixon, G. (1986). An Editor’s Expert System. Literary and Linguistic Computing, 1(3), 136–142. doi:10.1093/llc/1.3.136
Phillips, M. (1987). Microcomputers and the Teaching of Literature. Literary and Linguistic Computing, 2(3), 176–184. doi:10.1093/llc/2.3.176
Cunningham, S. J. (1996). Machine Learning Applications in Anthropology: Automated Discovery over Kinship Structures. Computers and the Humanities, 30(6), 401–406.
Lehmann, W. P., & Bennett, W. S. (1985). Human Language and Computers. Computers and the Humanities, 19(2), 77–83.
Wilks, Y. (1977). Programs and Texts. Computers and the Humanities, 11(4), 259–263.
Farringdon, M. G. (1970). Symposium on the Uses of the Computer in Literary Research: A Conference Report. Computers and the Humanities, 4(5), 315–317.
Joyce, J. (1977). Hardware for the Humanist: What You Should Know and Why. Computers and the Humanities, 11(5), 299–307.
Review. (1990). Computers and the Humanities, 24(1/2), 121–124.
Hirsch, Brett D. () Digital Humanities Pedagogy: Practices, Principles and Politics


DH: Possibilities and Challenges of telepresence/live interaction over networks

Key Reading:

Dubnov, Shlomo; Stuart-Thompson, B.; Bezberg, E.; Eliram, E. (2011) Expressions: Inter-professional Culture via Coactive Digital Humanities Platform. Culture and Computing (Culture Computing), 2011 Second International Conference on , vol., no., pp.171,172, 20-22. [not accessible online]

Abstract: This paper explores an integrated inter-professional collaborative model and technology for a break-through digital humanities platform called Expressions. This platform was co-created by the Center for Research in Entertainment & Learning (CREL) at Calit2, UCSD and Visual Exchange Network (VEN), which is an hybrid research and production corporation for upstream 'coactive' multi-venue media.

Piccini, Angela. (2009). Locating Grid Technologies: Performativity, Place, Space: Challenging the Institutionalized Spaces of e-Science.
Digital Humanities Quarterly, 3(4). http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/3/4/000076/000076.html
Keywords: Workshop, time and space, technologies, e-Science, performativity, place, practice-based research, grid technologies

The author describes the research workshop series Performativity, Place, Space which is aimed to investigate how the technologies of e-Science might “inform new understandings of space and time for distributed, creative research practices”. The author reviews the history of e-Science with a focus on the “large-scale, distributed collaborative research enabled through the Internet” rather than high performance computing; explores e-Science in the Screen and Performing Arts noting the current use of technology such as with works coming out of the ZKM; provides an overview of the Locating Grid technologies workshop that explored e-Science tools rather than the established performance media software such as MaxMSP, PureData , and Isodora; and explored Collaboration, tools and Infrastructure noting “fragmentations of space and time in networked environments”; explored Fragmentation and Mapping of performers noting that “(t)he recording, mapping and annotating of fragmented performance brings to the fore those exact qualities of the live event that escape documentation”. The author describes each workshop in the series noting what was revealed .

Further Resources:

Castricano, Jodey. (2011). "Testing the Limits": What Happens When Digital Humanities Meets Alternative Worldviews. Digital Studies, 2(2).
http://www.digitalstudies.org/ojs/index.php/digital_studies/article/view/181/249#d1e365
Abstract:
"Testing the Limits" reflects upon the implications of a conceptual paradigm shift in theoretical approaches to the use of immersive technologies in a postcolonial, post-positivistic world. This reflection means bringing into proximity alternative explanatory models of "reality"—such as the indigenous philosophy of Leroy Little Bear where it relates to Western science, David Peat's thoughts on quantum theory and his collaboration with Leroy Little Bear, and the theory of synchronicity as developed by Carl G. Jung in collaboration with physicist Wolfgang Pauli—where these models open into alternative worldviews which offer a hypothetical rapprochement in the history of consciousness between science and art. This study, therefore, focuses less on the use of immersive technology in the Humanities than on the instrumentality of theory itself in constructing perceptual models of reality (including scientific and artistic worldviews), especially where it is "virtual" and where it needs to consider diverse philosophies, scientific theories and representations of space/time in relation to subjectivities. To illustrate this claim, the media work by Canadian artist Char Davies will be offered as a case study; Davies has gone on record seeking to subvert the visual aesthetic in VR and 3D computer graphics, which, in striving for "ever great photo realism," serves only to reinforce "the Cartesian divide between dominating subject and passive object." It is relevant in the context of this essay that Char Davies is a software developer and artist whose work is informed not only by her understanding of the history of consciousness in Western metaphysics, but also by her understanding of the relation of such history to quantum theory.

Getto, G., & Silva, M. L. (2012). Doing multimodal research the easy way: A workflow for making sense of technologically complex communication situations. In Proceedings of the 30th ACM international conference on design of communication (pp. 89–94). ACM. Retrieved from http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2379075

The author describes a framework for multimodal research drawing on a methodology know as Systemic Functional Multimodal Discourse Analysis (SF-MDA). An overview is provided discussing SF-MDA and Social Semiotic theory, workflow using SF-MDA, data collection, and analysis.

Kelly, V.H. (2011) Instructional design practices in the design and development of Digital Humanities virtual environments (DH-VEs). Ph.D. thesis, Capella University.
Abstract:
Virtual environments, virtual worlds, simulations, 3D models are loaded with potential, promise, and problems. While learning in virtual settings is still being researched, instructional designers are challenged as to which instructional design practices are best suited for virtual environments (VEs). The problem is there is a lack of a conceptual or analytical framework in which to inspire instructional design. Through VEs, Humanities scholars and learners are able to experience ancient cultures and artifacts, as they existed centuries ago--a privilege previously impossible prior to the digitization of ancient environments. This research study briefly examines various types of learning conducive to Digital Humanities virtual environments (DH-VEs) and expounds on the instructional design behind the scenes that make possible the creation of such vivid environments. Through a review of recent literature, it is unknown if (and what types of) traditional instructional design practices are being used in the development of DH-VEs. The purpose of this study was to solicit expert opinion for the purpose of reporting a set of recommendations for effective instructional design practices used in the design and development of DH-VEs. Also included in this study are conclusions and implications regarding the instructional design of DH-VEs, as well as future DH-VE and instructional design research, a compilation of instructional design practices and lessons learned, and recommendations for future research.
https://www.editlib.org/p/119543/
[full dissertation is not available online - paid versions only]

Lesage, Frederik. (2009). Conventions of telepresence: designing spaces and media objects for media art experiences, sect. 4.3.1. In Networks for art work : an analysis of artistic creative engagements with new media standards, Pgs. 115-119. Retrieved from London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE).
http://etheses.lse.ac.uk/75/1/Lesage_Networks_for_art_work.pdf

The author references two telematic art works, Hole in Space and Telematic Dreaming, to aid in describing telematic art while exploring the challenges and potentials of the medium.

Sermon, P 2010 'Telematic Practice and Research Discourses: Three Practice-based Research Project Case', in: Gardine, H & Gere, C (eds.), Art Practice in a Digital Culture, First edition, Ashgate Publishing, London, United Kingdom, pp.153-164.

Abstract: This chapter focuses on the production, documentation and preservation of the author’s telematic, practice-based research in the interactive media arts. It reflects a timely practice review with significant implications for the future of exhibiting and archiving the broad range of creative arts in this field. These fundamental research questions also have relevance across a number of practice-based research fields including performance arts and the ephemeral nature of open-system interactive artworks. The objective of this chapter is to propose research methods that will approach the question of how to document and archive appropriately this transient creative practice that is so often reliant on its immediate cultural and historic context. Since the early 1990s my artistic practice has identified and questioned the notions of embodiment and disembodiment in relation to the interacting performer in telematic and telepresent art installations. At what point is the performer embodying the virtual performer in front of them? Have they therefore become disembodied by doing so? A number of interactive telematic artworks will be looked at in detail in this chapter. These case studies range from Kit Galloway and Sherrie Rabinowitz’s seminal work ‘Hole-in-Space’ to my own telepresent experiments with ‘Telematic Dreaming’ and include the current emerging creative/critical discourse in Second Life, the networked virtual/social environment, that polarizes fundamental existential questions concerning identity, the self, the ego and the (dis)embodied avatar. The preservation and documentation of this work is extremely problematic when we consider the innate issues of (dis)embodiment in relation to presence and intimacy, as experienced and performed in telematic and virtual environments. How can it become possible to reencounter a performance of dispersed and expanded bodies, multiple and interconnected identities, spectral representations and auras: in short, hybrid bodies (selves) made of flesh and digital technologies, and the intimate connections between them.

Saltz, D. Z. (2004). Performing Arts. A Companion to Digital Humanities. Retrieved from http://nora.lis.uiuc.edu:3030/companion/view?docId=blackwell/9781405103213/9781405103213.xml&chunk.id=ss1-2-11&toc.depth=1&toc.id=ss1-2-11&brand=9781405103213_brand&query=tele*#33

The author reviews impact of computers on the performing arts by traversing a brief history starting with database analysis, hypermedia, 3-D modeling, performance simulations, and then computers in performance and telematic performance. The author uses examples to mark the history concluding that "(t)he use of computers in the performing arts does not merely add a new tool to an old discipline,..., it blurs the boundaries between performance disciplines,.., it blurs the boundaries between scholarship and creative practice, ... [and] digital technology is challenging the very distinction between "liveness" and media.

Siemens, L. (2011). The Balance between On-line and In-person Interactions: Methods for the Development of Digital Humanities Collaboration. Digital Studies / Le Champ Numérique, 2(1). Retrieved from https://www.digitalstudies.org/ojs/index.php/digital_studies/article/view/184

The author explores the role of digital and in-person collaboration tools and the pros and cons of each particular method: face-to-face, Emails and other text-based asynchronous communication tools, and Conference calls, either by telephone or VOIP, and instant messaging/chat rooms. The author draws on research from 11 interviews with DH practitioner who are currently working on DH projects.

Beaulieu, Anne. (2010). Research Note: From co-location to co-presence: Shifts in the use of ethnography for the study of knowledge. Social Studies of Science, 40(3).

Abstract: Ethnography has been successfully deployed in science and technology studies, and more specifically in laboratory studies. By using co-presence rather than co-location as a starting point to conceptualize and articulate fieldwork, new aspects of knowledge production are foregrounded in ethnographic studies. This research note proposes and discusses co-presence as an epistemic strategy that pays close attention to non-lab based knowledge production that can embrace textuality, infrastructure and mediation, and that draws into relief the role of ethnographer as author, participant-observer and scholar. Furthermore, co-presence as an approach to doing fieldwork generates new prospects for the study of knowledge production. It enables STS to develop the ethnographic study of highly mediated, distributed or non-lab-based fields, such as the humanities, e-research and e-science.

Kac, Eduardo. (2005). Telepresence and Bio Art -- Networking Humans, Rabbits and Robots. University of Michigan Press.

Lesage, F. (2011). Telepresence and its transparent infrastructures.. Digital Creativity, 22, 103-114.

Abstract:This article critically examines Jay David Bolter and Richard Grusin's concept of remediation, specifically as it pertains to their conceptualisation of transparency, through a detailed analysis of a series of telematic artworks. Their problematic definition of remediation leads to an understanding of telepresence as a medium that denies transparency and aggressively insists for the social and physical reality of media, yet such a definition does not provide the analytical tools required to determine how these conditions are produced in the first place. Remediation, it will be argued, falls short for studying the relations of power that enable and constrain representation, particularly in the case of media such as telepresence. A solution is found in Leah Lievrouw's ‘reconfiguration’ as a complement to remediation. Based on findings from a recent case study, the article will show how this dual approach can be employed to study how artists appropriate information infrastructure.
Note: not accessible online

Ulmer, Gregory. (2011). Avatar Emergency. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 5(3). http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/5/3/000100/000100.html?aprilfool=false

Abstract: The original usage of avatar referred to the incarnation or human appearance of a deity, particularly Vishnu, in Hindu mythology. The term was adapted to cyberspace to name one’s online persona. This usage has come to include every aspect of one’s online representation, from the icon on a blog, or an email signature to the figure one plays in Second Life. Avatar, then, is a practical point of entry for theorizing the emergence of the new identity experience of electracy, that is supplementing and displacing selfhood, the identity formation of literacy. Playing one’s avatar is to electracy what writing an essay is to literacy. The point addressed in this essay is that an avatar is not merely the appearance of one’s representation, since through interactivity and even telepresence, I am t/here with my image. What is it to be/have an image? The answer begins with noting the literal meaning of the avatar in Sanskrit: "Descent." Vishnu has descended (taken on embodiment) nine times, to correct a disordered world condition. This essay initiates a review of the cultural archive to see what is known already about our question (representations of "descent"). It is perhaps obvious, considering the prominence of Christianity in our heritage, that the West accumulated a huge amount of information about becoming body. Two examples are referenced in this introductory piece: Krishna and Orpheus.

Wankel, Charles (Ed) (2013). Digital Humanities: Current Perspective, Practices, and Research. Emerald Group Publishing [not accessible online]

Craenen, B., Murgatroyd, P., Theodoropoulos, G., Gaffney, V., & Suryanarayanan, V. (2012). MWGrid: A system for distributed agent-based simulation in the digital humanities. 2012 IEEE/ACM 16th International Symposium on Distributed Simulation and Real Time Applications, , 124-131. doi:10.1109/DS-RT.2012.24

Digital Humanities offer a new exciting domain for agent-based distributed simulation. In historical studies interpretation rarely rises above the level of unproven assertion and is rarely tested against a range of evidence. Agent-based simulation can provide an opportunity to break these cycles of academic claim and counterclaim. The MWGrid framework utilises distributed agent based simulation to study medieval military logistics. As a use-case, it has focused on the logistical analysis of the Byzantine army's march to the battle of Manzikert (AD 1071), a key event in medieval history. It integrates an agent design template, a transparent, layered mechanism to translate model-level agents' actions to time stamped events and the PDES-MAS distributed simulation kernel. The paper presents an overview of the MWGrid system and a quantitative evaluation of its performance.



Possible Interest:

Technology and Cyberinfrastructure


Bamman, David; Crane, Gregory. (2009). Computational Linguistics and Classical Lexicography. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 3(1). http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/3/1/000033/000033.html
Keywords: Cyberinfrastructure, computer science,

Bellamy, Craig. (2012). The Sound of Many Hands Clapping: Teaching the Digital Humanities through Virtual Research Environment (VREs). Digital Humanities Quarterly 6(2). http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/6/2/000119/000119.html
Keywords: Computer Science

Butts, J.J. (2011). Missed Connections: The Collective Novel and the Metropolis. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 5(2).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/5/2/000092/000092.html
Keywords: precursor to network narratives.

Cayley, John. (2011). Writing to be Found and Writing Readers. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 5(2).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/5/3/000104/000104.html

Collins, E., Bulger, M., & Meyer, E. (2012). Discipline matters: Technology use in the humanities. Arts and Humanities in Higher Education, 11(1-2), 76-92. doi:10.1177/1474022211427421

In recent years, many studies have highlighted the changing nature of scholarly research, reflecting the new digital tools and techniques that have been developed. But researcher uptake of these tools is strongly influenced by existing information behaviour, itself affected by a number of factors, particularly discipline. This article outlines findings from a recent study which used six case studies to look at the information behaviours of researchers working in different disciplinary fields or academic departments, or using specific tools. The study suggested that researchers’ uses of, and attitudes towards, digital technologies are affected by existing disciplinary habits and preconceptions. Furthermore, it found that the computational and collaborative complexity of the tools that researchers used was linked to their disciplinary backgrounds.

Crane, Gregory; Seales, Brent; and Terras, Milissa. (2007) Cyberinfrastructure for Classical Philology. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 3(1). http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/3/1/000023/000023.html
(poster) Keywords: Cyberinfrastructure

Evens, Aden. (2012). Web 2.0 and the Ontology of the Digital. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 6(2).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/6/2/000120/000120.html

Gibbs, Fred. (2012). Building Better Digital Humanities Tools: Toward broader audiences and user-centered designs. Digital Humanities Quarterly 6(2). http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/6/2/000136/000136.html

Gold, Nicolas. (2009). Service-Oriented Software in the Humanities: 
A Software Engineering Perspective. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 3(4).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/3/4/000072/000072.html
Keywords: computer science, flexible software systems

Gordon, Eric; Bogen, David. (2009). Designing Choreographies for the "New Economy of Attention". Digital Humanities Quarterly, 1(2).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/3/2/000049/000049.html
Keywords: technology and pedagogy

*Hedges, Mark. (2009). Grid-enabling Humanities Datasets. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 3(4). http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/3/4/000078/000078.html
Keywords:

Lavin, Stacy. (2011). The Globe is All One: Wars I Have Seen as Proto-Network Narrative. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 5(2).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/5/2/000096/000096.html

Montfort, Nick. (2012). cut to fit the tool-spun course. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 7(1).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/7/1/000149/000149.html

Rettberg, Scott. (2009). Communitizing Electronic Literature. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 3(2).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/3/2/000046/000046.html
Keywords: Born digital, networked based literary culture

Schreibman, Susan. (2010). Determining Value for Digital Humanities Tools: Report on a Survey of Tool Developers. Digital Humanities Quarterly 4(2).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/4/2/000083/000083.html
Keywords: Tools, tool developers, evaluation of,

Smithies, James. (2011). A View from IT. Digital Humanities Quarterly 5(2).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/5/3/000107/000107.html

Terras, Melissa M. (2009). The Potential and Problems in using High Performance Computing in the Arts and Humanities: the Researching e-Science Analysis of Census Holdings (ReACH) Project. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 3(4). http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/3/4/000070/000070.html
Keywords: grid computing, large data sets,

Unsworth, John. (2009). The Making of "Our Cultural Commonwealth". Digital Humanities Quarterly, 3(4).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/3/4/000073/000073.html
Keywords: cyberinfrastucture

Networks


Croxall, Brian; Sutton Koeser, Rebecca. (2013) Networking the Belfast Group through the Automated Semantic Enhancement of Existing Digital Content. Journal of Digital Humanities, 2(3). http://journalofdigitalhumanities.org/2-3/networking-the-belfast-group-through-the-automated-semantic-enhancement-of-existing-digital-content/

The author discusses analysis software through the description of the "networking the Belfast Group" project.
(poster) Keywords: network, digital content

Weingart, Scott B. Demystifying Networks, Parts I & II. The Journal for Digital Humanities 1(1).
http://journalofdigitalhumanities.org/1-1/demystifying-networks-by-scott-weingart/
Keywords: networks

Data and Data Mining

Argamon, Shlomo; Olsen, Mark. (2009). Words, Patterns and Documents: Experiments in Machine Learning and Text Analysis. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 3(2).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/3/2/000041/000041.html
Keywords: Data mining

Argamon, Shlomo; Goulain, Jean-Baptist; Horton, Russell; and Olsen, Mark.Vive la Différence! Text Mining Gender Difference in French Literature.
Digital Humanities Quarterly, 3(2). http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/3/2/000042/000042.html
Keywords: Data mining

Argamon, Shlomo; Clooney, Charles; Horton, Russell; Olsen, Mark; Stein, Sterling; and Voyer, Robert. Gender, Race, and Nationality in Black Drama, 1950-2006: Mining Differences in Language Use in Authors and their Characters. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 3(2).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/3/2/000043/000043.html
Keywords: Data mining

Horton, Russell; Morrissey, Robert; Olsen, Mark; Roe, Glenn; and Voyer, RobertMining Eighteenth Century Ontologies: Machine Learning and Knowledge Classification in the Encyclopédie. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 3(2). http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/3/2/000044/000044.html
Keywords: Data mining, Machine Learning

Hoover, David. (2007). The End of the Irrelevant Text: Electronic Texts, Linguistics, and Literary Theory. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 1(2).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/1/2/000012/000012.html

Meehan, Sean Ross. (2009). Text Minding: "A Response to Gender, Race, and Nationality in Black Drama, 1850-2000: Mining Differences in Language Use in Authors and their Character. The Journal of Digital Humanities, 3(2). http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/3/2/000045/000045.html
Keywords: Data Mining

Owens, Trevor. (2012) Defining Data for Humanists: Text, Artifact, Information or Evidence? The Journal of Digital Humanities, 1(1).http://journalofdigitalhumanities.org/1-1/defining-data-for-humanists-by-trevor-owens/

Schoch, Christor. (2013). Big? Smart? Clean? Messy? Data in the Humanities. The Journal of Digital Humanities, 2(3).
http://journalofdigitalhumanities.org/2-3/big-smart-clean-messy-data-in-the-humanities/
Questioning the relationship between "data" and a researcher's object of study the author argues that there are 2 types of data in the Humanities, big data and smart data and attempts to define "big smart data".

Simpson, John; Rockwell, Geoffrey; Chartier, Ryan; Sinclair, Stefan; Brown, Susan; Dyrbye, Amy; and Uszkalo, Kirsten. (2013). Text Mining Tools in the Humanities: An Analysis Framework. The Journal of Digital Humanities. http://journalofdigitalhumanities.org/2-3/text-mining-tools-in-the-humanities-an-analysis-framework/

Design

Games, Gaming and Interfaces

Antley, Jeremy. (2012). Games and Historical Narratives .The Journal of Digital Humanities 1(2).
http://journalofdigitalhumanities.org/1-2/games-and-historical-narratives-by-jeremy-antley/

Boluk, Stephanie. (2012). Stretched Skulls: Anamorphic Games and the memento mortem mortis. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 6(2).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/6/2/000122/000122.html
Keywords: Games, phenomenology

Drucker, Johanna. (2012). Performative Materiality and Theoretical Approaches to Interface. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 7(1). http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/7/1/000143/000143.html

Howard, Jeff. (2007). Interpretative Quests in Theory and Pedagogy. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 1(1).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/1/1/000002/000002.html
Keywords: Gaming, Literature

Jerz, Dennis G. (2007). Somewhere Nearby is Colossal Cave: Examining Will Crowther's Original "Adventure" in Code and in Kentucky.
Digital Humanities Quarterly, 1(2). www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/1/2/000009/000009.html
Keywords: Games, text, gaming

Kashtan, Aaron. (2011). Because It's Not There: Ekphrasis and the Threat of Graphics in Interactive Fiction. Digital Humanities Quarterly 5(1).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/5/1/000101/000101.html
Keywords: interactive fiction, gaming,

*Ruecker, Stan. (2009). Designing Data Mining Droplets: New Interface Objects for the Humanities Scholar. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 3(3).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/3/3/000067/000067.html
Keywords: Data mining, New interfaces

Sample, Mark L. (2012). Criminal Code: Procedural Logic and Rhetorical Excess in Videogames. Digital Humanities Quarterly 7(1).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/7/1/000153/000153.html.

Sandifer, Philip. (2009). Avatari: Disruption and Imago in Video Games. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 3(3).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/3/3/000066/000066.html
Keywords: Gaming, avatar, avatari

Visualization and Representations


Barnet, Belinda. (2010). Crafting the User-Centered Document Interface: The Hypertext Editing System (HES) and the File Retrieval and Editing System (FRESS). Digital Humanities Quarterly, 4(1).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/4/1/000081/000081.html
Keywords: Interface

Beale, Gareth; Beale, Nicole; Dawson, Ian; and Minkin, Louisa. (2013). Making Digital: Visual Approaches to the Digital Humanities. Journal of Digital Humanities, 2(3).http://journalofdigitalhumanities.org/2-3/making-digital-visual-approaches-to-the-digital-humanities/

The author discusses the impact of 3D data capture and 3D printing on Archeology and Art by describing The Making History Project. The reasons for creating a collaborative project between art and archeology are outlined focusing on the multidisciplinary nature and technology. The project is event based and include 1) a workshop in 3D technology, 2) printing workshop for archeologists, 3) portus head: art and archeology, a bust sculpture that has been rendered virtually in 3D, 4) demo of a 3D prototyping apparatus, 5) stored collection visits, 6) ‘How to’ Advice for Art/Archaeology Transition Students, 7) Basing House Excavation, 8) Exhibition at Winchester Discovery Centre, Milestones Museum and Willis Museum, 9) INTECH Science Centre After Dark, and 10) Development of Art/Archaeology Course
"As artists it is novel to think that in observing, drawing or modelling we might be capturing, analysing and processing data."

Drucker, Johanna. (2011) Humanities Approaches to Graphical Display. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 5(1).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/5/1/000091/000091.html
Keywords: Graphic display, data,

Roberts-Smith, Jennifer; DeSouza-Coelho, Shawn; Dobson, Teresa M.; Gabriele, Sandra; Rodriguez-Arenas, Omar; Ruecker, Stan; Sinclair, Stéfan; Akong, Annmarie; Hong, Marcelo; Jakacki,Diane; Lam, David; Kovacs, Alexandra; and Northam, Lesley; Visualizing Theatrical Text: From Watching the Script to the Simulated Environment for Theatre (SET). Digital Humanities Quarterly, 7(3).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/7/3/000166/000166.html

Collaboration, Participation and Pedagogy


Blackwell, Christopher; Martin, Thomas R. (2009) Technology, Collaboration, and Undergraduate Research. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 3(1).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/3/1/000024/000024.html
Keywords: collaborative, open sholarship

Giglio, Katheryn. (2009). The Radical Historicity of Everything: Exploring Shakespearean Identity with Web 2.0. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 3(3).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/3/3/000063/000063.html
Keywords: pedagogy

Siemens, Lynne. (2012). Developing Academic Capacity in Digital Humanities: Thoughts from the Canadian Community. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 7(1).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/7/1/000114/000114.html

Toton, Sarah; Martin, Stacey. (2009). Teaching and Learning from the U.S. South in Global Contexts: A Case Study of Southern Spaces and Southcomb.
Digital Humanities Quarterly, 3(2). http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/3/2/000047/000047.html
Keywords: pedagogy, journal, on-line tools
.....

Choi, H., & Piro, J. M. (2009). Expanding arts education in a digital age. Arts Education Policy Review, 110(3), 27-34. doi:10.3200/AEPR.110.3.27-34

This article proposes a way to expand the study of arts education within new contexts of technology and globalization. Drawing upon theories that have informed arts and aesthetic education in the past, the authors suggest new applications for these ideas to ensure that arts education sustains its significance in twenty-first-century society. The article makes suggestions about how to redirect arts education policy to keep pace with rapid global and technological changes and developments in new media learning as students presently experience them. As an example of this change, a digital humanities project that uses Rembrandt's art as a teaching resource is highlighted, and suggestions are made on how the program may be used to advance arts education and arts policy.

Preservation, Archival, and Completion


Kirschenbaum, Matthew. (2012). The .txtual Condition: Digital Humanities, Born-Digital Archives, and the Future Literary.
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/7/1/000151/000151.html

Kirschenbaum, Mattew G. (2009). Done: Finishing Projects in the Digital Humanities. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 3(2).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/3/2/000037/000037.html
Keywords: done? (DHQ 3(2) has a section on this topic - when is a digital object finished?)

Kraus, Kari. (2012). Do You Want to Save Your Progress?: The Role of Professional and Player Communities in Preserving Virtual Worlds. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 6(2). http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/6/2/000129/000129.html

McDonough, Jerome; Kirschenbaum, Matthew; Reside, Doug; Fraistat, Neil; and Jerz, Dennis. (2010). Twisty Little Passages Almost All Alike: Applying the FRBR Model to a Classic Computer Game. Digital Humanities Quarterly 4(2).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/4/2/000089/000089.html
Keywords: Preserving Virtual Worlds Project

Robinson, Peter M. W. (2009). The Ends of Editing. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 3(3).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/3/3/000051/000051.html
Keywords: ends/done, open and participatory editing and reading

Publishing


Blackwell, Christopher; Crane, Gregory. (2009). Conclusion: Cyberinfrastructure, the Scaife Digital Library and Classics in a Digital age.
Digital Humanities Quarterly 3(1). http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/3/1/000035/000035.html

Brown, Susan; Clements, Patricia; Grundy, Isobel; Ruecker, Stan; Antoniuk, Jeffery; and Balazs, Sharon. (2009). Published Yet Never Done: The Tension Between Projection and Completion in Digital Humanities Research. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 3(2). http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/3/2/000040/000040.html

Cavanagh, Sheila. (2012) Living in a Digital World: Rethinking Peer Review, Collaboration, and Open Access. The Journal of Digital Humanities, 1(4).
http://journalofdigitalhumanities.org/1-4/living-in-a-digital-world-by-sheila-cavanagh/

Crymble, Adam. (2013). FairCite. Digital Humanities Quarterly 7(2). http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/7/2/000164/000164.html

Galarza, Alex; Heppler, Jason; and Seefeldt, Douglas. (2012) A Call to Redefine Historical Scholarship in the Digital Turn. The Journal of Digital Humanities, 1(4).
http://journalofdigitalhumanities.org/1-4/a-call-to-redefine-historical-scholarship-in-the-digital-turn/

Mandell, Laura. (2012) Promotion and Tenure for Digital Scholarship. The Journal of Digital Humanities, 1(4).
http://journalofdigitalhumanities.org/1-4/promotion-and-tenure-for-digital-scholarship-by-laura-mandell/

Munoz, Trevor. (2013) Data Curation as Publishing for the Digital Humanities. Journal of Digital Humanities, 2(3)
http://journalofdigitalhumanities.org/2-3/data-curation-as-publishing-for-the-digital-humanities/

Poole, Alex H. (2013). Now is the Future Now? The Urgency of Digital Curation in the Digital Humanities. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 7(2).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/7/2/000163/000163.html

Raben, Joseph. (2007). Tenure, Promotion and Digital Publication. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 1(1).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/1/1/000006/000006.html

*Saisó, Ernesto Priani. (2007). Revista Digital Universitaria: A Workshop of Digital Editing at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 1(2). http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/1/2/000014/000014.html

Saliga, P., & Whiteside, A. (2013). Collaboration at its best: How dozens of digital humanists helped a learned society create three online academic resources in four years. Visual Resources, 29(1-2), 120-128. doi:10.1080/01973762.2013.761123

Between 2008 and 2012, the Society of Architectural Historians (SAH) launched three online academic resources that provide new models for peer review and academic publishing. With funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities, SAH developed SAHARA (http://www.sah.org/publications-and-research/sahara; launched 2009), a shared image archive for teaching and research; JSAH Online (http://www.sah.org/publications-and-research/jsah; launched 2010), a multimedia scholarly journal; and SAH Archipedia (http://sah-archipedia.org/; launched 2012), an online encyclopedia of the global built environment. This article discusses the collaborations—with librarians, scholars, publishers, technology providers, and funders—necessary to create and sustain these new digital humanities resources. The authors also share lessons learned for all who plan to create digital academic resources.

Unsworth, John; Welsh, Anne; Nyhan, Julianne; and Salmon, Jessica. (2012). Postmodern Culture and More: an Oral History Conversation between John Unsworth and Anne Welsh. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 6(3).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/6/3/000132/000132.html

Wheeler, B. (2010). Journal identity in the digital age. Journal of Scholarly Publishing, 42(1), 45-88. doi:10.3138/jsp.42.1.45

Wharton, Robin. (2012). 7(1). Digital Humanities, Copyright Law, and the Literary. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 7(1).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/7/1/000147/000147.html

The Journal of the Digital Humanities Vol. 1, No. 4 Fall 2012

Evaluating digital/Multimodal work


Mattern, Shannon Christine. (2012) Evaluating Multimodal Work, Revisited. The Journal of Digital Humanities, 1(4).
http://journalofdigitalhumanities.org/1-4/evaluating-multimodal-work-revisited-by-shannon-mattern/

Nowviskie, Bethany. (2012). Evaluating Collaborative Digital Scholarship (or, Where Credit is Due). The Journal of Digital Humanities, 1(4).
http://journalofdigitalhumanities.org/1-4/evaluating-collaborative-digital-scholarship-by-bethany-nowviskie

Presner, Todd. (2012). How to Evaluate Digital Scholarship. The Journal of Digital Humanities, 1(4).
http://journalofdigitalhumanities.org/1-4/how-to-evaluate-digital-scholarship-by-todd-presner/

Rockwell, Geoffrey. (2012). Short Guide To Evaluation Of Digital Work. The Journal of Digital Humanities, 1(4).
http://journalofdigitalhumanities.org/1-4/short-guide-to-evaluation-of-digital-work-by-geoffrey-rockwell/

Smithies, James. (2012). Evaluating Scholarly Digital Outputs: The Six Layers Approach. The Journal of Digital Humanities, 1(4). http://journalofdigitalhumanities.org/1-4/evaluating-scholarly-digital-outputs-by-james-smithies/

Facilities and Courses:


Cunningham, Richard; Duke, David; Eustace, John; Galway, Anna; and Patterson, Erin. (2007) The Humanities HyperMedia Centre @ Acadia University: An Invitation to Think About Higher Education. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 2(1). http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/2/1/000016/000016.html

Miscellaneous


Schoenbeck, Robert. (2013). Playing with Chance: On Random Generation in Playable Media and Electronic Literature. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 2(3).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/7/3/000165/000165.html


**Trettien, W.(2013) Circuit Bending Digital Humanities. Retrieved from blog April 15, 2014.
http://blog.whitneyannetrettien.com/2013/01/circuit-bending-digital-humanities.html

Beal, Wesley. (2011). Network Narration in John Dos Passos’s U.S.A. Trilogy. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 5(2).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/5/2/000094/000094.html
Keywords: network, archive

Gage, Molly. (2011). Winesburg, Ohio: A Modernist Kluge. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 5(2).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/5/2/000093/000093.html
Keywords: network

Sauter, D. (2009). The Emergence Project: 
A Machine of Expression. Journal Of The Chicago Colloquium On Digital Humanities And Computer Science, 1(1). Retrieved from https://letterpress.uchicago.edu/index.php/jdhcs/article/view/11/29

Clement, Tanya; Tcheng, David; Auvil, Loretta; Capitanu, Boris; and Monroe, Megan. (2012). Sounding for Meaning: Using Theories of Knowledge Representation to Analyze Aural Patterns in Texts. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 7(1).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/7/1/000146/000146.html

Elliot, Tom; Gillies, Sean. (2009). Digital Geography and Classics. Digital Humanities Quarterly 3(1).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/3/1/000031/000031.html
Keywords:

Fiormonte, Domenico. (2010). Digital Encoding as a Hermeneutic and Semiotic Act: The Case of Valerio Magrelli. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 4(1).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/4/1/000082/000082.html
Keywords: XML
Quote: "Our conclusion is that there is a potential conflict between the linear and hierchical nature of current formal language systems such as XML, and the intrinsic dynamic nature of the writing process. In such cases we may have to rethink present models of document modeling, and to develop, within an adequate epistemological framework, a new theory of digital text."

Flanders, Julia. (2009). The Productive Unease of 21st-century Digital Scholarship. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 3(3).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/3/3/000055/000055.html
Keywords: representation, medium, and structures of scholarly communication.

Holloway-Attaway, Lissa. (2012). Beyond Representation: Embodied Expression and Social Me-dia. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 6(2).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/6/2/000118/000118.html
Keywords: Embodiment

Kraus, Kari. (2009). Conjectural Criticism: Computing Past and Future Texts. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 3(4).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/3/4/000069/000069.html
Keywords: relevant project?

McDonough, Jerome. (2009). XML, Interoperability and the Social Construction of Markup Languages: The Library Example. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 3(3).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/3/3/000064/000064.html
Keywords: code, XML

McCall, Jeremiah. (2012). Historical Simulations as Problem Spaces: Criticism and Classroom Use. The Journal of Digital Humanities, 1(2).
http://journalofdigitalhumanities.org/1-2/historical-simulations-as-problem-spaces-by-jeremiah-mccall/

Mayer, Vicki; and Griffith, Mike. (2013). MediaNOLA: A Digital Humanities Project to Tell Stories of Cultural Production in New Orleans. The Journal of the Digital Humanities, 2(2). http://journalofdigitalhumanities.org/2-2/medianola-by-vicki-mayer-and-mike-griffith/

The author describes the development of the project MediaNOLA, a website that "provide(s) an alternative way to examine New Orleans’ culture solely through the lens of its exceptionalism in relation to the rest of the United States" motivated by 2 objectives:
  1. The creation of website content that would demonstrate the contributions of ordinary people, places, and practices to local culture; and,
  2. The establishment of a pedagogic model for training university students to be creators of these contents in collaboration with community partners, including library archivists and nonprofit organizations.
The topics of planning and the project team, expanding users and audiences, content decisions, pedagogic choices, technological choices, and accomplishments of the planning grant are covered.
Keywords: community website development, technology, pedagogy, community participation, collaboration
Related: Wiley, Amber N. (2013) Integrating Architecture into Digital and Public Humanities: Sites and Sounds + MediaNOLA. The Journal of the Digital Humanities 2(2). http://journalofdigitalhumanities.org/2-2/integrating-architecture-into-digital-and-public-humanities-by-amber-wiley/

Murray, Annie; Wiercinski, Jared. (2014) A Design Methodology for Web-based Sound Archives. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 8(1). http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/8/1/000173/000173.html

Price, Daniel; Koontz, Rex; and Lovings, Lauren. (2013). Curating Digital Spaces, Making Visual Arguments: A Case Study in New Media Presentations of Ancient Objects. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 7(2). http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/7/2/000159/000159.html

Robinson, P. (2009). What Scholarly Editors Need to Help us Make Sense Together in the Digital Age. Journal Of The Chicago Colloquium On Digital Humanities And Computer Science, 1(1). Retrieved from https://letterpress.uchicago.edu/index.php/jdhcs/article/view/64

Siemens, Ray; Timney, Meagan; Leitch, Cara; Koolen, Corina; and Garnett, Alex. (2012). Pertinent Discussions Toward Modeling the Social Edition: Annotated Bibliographies. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 6(1).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/6/1/000111/000111.html

Wolff, Mark. (2007). Reading Potential: The Oulipo and the Meaning of Algorithms. Digital Humanities Quarterly, 1(1).
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/1/1/000005/000005.html
Keywords: Algorithms

Zöllner-Weber, Amélie. (2009). Ontologies and Logic Reasoning as Tools in Humanities? Digital Humanities Quarterly, 3(4). http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/3/4/000068/000068.html
Keywords: Logic based reasoning


Other Info:


Books: When possible go through online books and add relevant material to categories
Digital Humanities Companion: http://nora.lis.uiuc.edu:3030/companion/view?docId=blackwell/9781405103213/9781405103213.xml
Digital Humanities:
Lunenfeld, Peter; Burdick, Anne; Drucker, Johanna; Presner, Todd; and Schnapp, Jeffery. (2012). "The Social Life of the Digital Humanities." Digital Humanities.
Cambridge, MA: MIT, 2012. 73-98.
http://mitpress.mit.edu/sites/default/files/titles/content/9780262018470_Open_Access_Edition.pdf

Digital Humanities Pedagogy: Practices, Principles and Politics
debates in DH
Understanding the digital humanities
The Emergence of the Digital Humanities
- intro and Chapter 1 available online
MIT Press - Digital humanities category: https://mitpress.mit.edu/disciplines/new-media-and-digital-humanities/digital-humanities

Journals:
Journal of Digital Humanities http://journalofdigitalhumanities.org/
Digital Humanities Now http://digitalhumanitiesnow.org/
Digital Humanities Quarterly http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/
https://letterpress.uchicago.edu/index.php/jdhcs/issue/view/8
Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy http://jitp.commons.gc.cuny.edu/
Literary & Linguistic Computing Published By: Oxford University Press
Humanist Studies & the Digital Age
http://vectorsjournal.org/archive/
The Fibreculture Journal
http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/index

DH Organizations:
Alliance of Digital Humanities Organizations http://adho.org/
Canadian Center for Digital Humanities http://csdh-schn.org/

Projects:
Journal of the Digital Humanities 1(3) - section with multiple projects